The Biggest Personality Differences Between Tea and Coffee Drinkers

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woman at work with her cup of coffee on her desk

If you’re a creative, introverted morning person, then odds are you prefer coffee over tea.

A new study of 2,000 Americans examined the personality differences in people based on their morning beverage of choice: coffee or tea.

You’d expect coffee fans to be the buzzy, loud ones up at all hours; however, the results found that tea drinkers are more likely to be extroverted, adventurous night owls.

The survey, conducted by OnePoll on behalf of the Chinet brand, revealed that the average coffee drinker typically downs 3.4 cups a day, while tea fans sip through 2.7 cups.

All that caffeine appeared to have an impact on sleep cycles, seeing as coffee drinkers were found to be more likely to be “light” sleepers.

Over half (57 percent) of tea drinkers were self-described “average” sleepers.

If coffee drinkers are light sleepers then it might be what’s helping them hear their first alarm and be punctual. Coffee fans are more likely to say they’re “always” on time.

“With over 75 percent of respondents drinking their first cup of coffee or tea before 8 a.m., people are looking to fuel their life on the go,” said a spokesperson for the Chinet brand. “From the car to the carpool, people are taking their drinks with them as they tackle whatever their day brings.”

The coffee versus tea debate even spanned into entertainment. Tea drinkers were more likely to enjoy “The Walking Dead,” “Friends” and “The Big Bang Theory” on TV, while coffee fans preferred “Grey’s Anatomy,” “The Office” and “Seinfeld.”

Music tastes varied between the two groups as well. Respondents that go for coffee like listening to punk, rock, blues and jazz.

Fans of tea love to put on a little classical, country, pop or hip-hop/rap.

When it comes to what goes in the hot drink of choice, coffee lovers are 96 percent more likely than tea drinkers to enjoy their brew straight.

Tea fans were 35 percent more likely to have a sweet tooth and add sugar to their drinks.

Coffee drinkers were pretty straight up when it came to why they prefer the beverage. They were 41 percent more likely to choose a steamy cup of joe because of its caffeine quantity.

Caffeine turned out to be the main reason for deterring those who prefer tea, seeing as 37 percent said “too much caffeine” was the coffee turnoff.

A little morning tea just doesn’t do it for coffee connoisseurs because over a third find tea to be “too boring.”

That all-important caffeine buzz was a serious highlight for coffee lovers since four in 10 described themselves as “in need of caffeine” first thing in the morning.

“We all wish we could have the luxury of a slow morning at home, leisurely drinking our coffee or tea before heading out the door for errands or work,” added the spokesperson for the Chinet brand.

Continue on to the New York Post to read the complete article.

How to Celebrate Mother’s Day from Home

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Laptop webcam screen view multiethnic families contacting Mother on Mother's day by video conference

Mother’s Day is quickly approaching, and while we can’t go to a restaurant, or in some cases, even be close to each other, there are still plenty of ways we can celebrate the special women in our lives.

Here are three of our favorites.

1) Host a Zoom Get Together

Host a Zoom meeting with your mom, siblings, and other family members during the time you would normally get together for Mother’s Day. Gathering all of your mother’s loved ones in one place, even digitally, is a great way for your mom to feel loved on Mother’s Day while also feeling safe.

2) Surprise Delivery!

Whether it be flowers, food, a handwritten card, or a thoughtful gift from a local business, utilizing delivery services is a fantastic way to show your mom you are thinking about her, even if you can’t be there in person. You can even Skype, FaceTime or talk on the phone while your mom receives her present!

3) Make her the Center of Attention

Gather your family together (either virtually or in person if you are self-isolating together) and have everyone talk about their favorite story about their mom. It can be a funny story they have shared, their favorite memory, or about what she means to you and how you appreciate everything she does. Taking the time to celebrate Mother’s Day will show the significant woman in your life how loved she really is.

 

BECOMING – OFFICIAL TRAILER

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Michelle Obama book jacket cover

BECOMING is an intimate look into the life of former First Lady Michelle Obama during a moment of profound change, not only for her personally but for the country she and her husband served over eight impactful years in the White House.

The film offers a rare and up-close look at her life, taking viewers behind the scenes as she embarks on a 34-city tour that highlights the power of community to bridge our divides and the spirit of connection that comes when we openly and honestly share our stories.

Film Release Date: May 6, 2020
Format: Original Documentary Feature

Directed by: Nadia Hallgren
Produced by: Katy Chevigny,
Marilyn Ness, & Lauren Cioffi
Co-Producer: Maureen A. Ryan
Executive Producers:
Priya Swaminathan & Tonia Davis

A NOTE FROM MICHELLE
I’m excited to let you know that on May 6, Netflix will release BECOMING, a documentary film directed by Nadia Hallgren that looks at my life and the experiences I had while touring following the release of my memoir. Those months I spent traveling—meeting and connecting with people in cities across the globe—drove home the idea that what we share in common is deep and real and can’t be messed with.

In groups large and small, young and old, unique and united, we came together and shared stories, filling those spaces with our joys, worries, and dreams.

*BECOMING is the third release from Higher Ground Productions and Netflix*

For more information about the documentary visit, netflix.com/Becoming.

#IAmBecoming

The Chronic-ness of Disorganization

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A woman's hands on a laptop, surrounded by clutter on a desk

By Regina F. Lark, Ph.D., CPO, NGLCC certified

Where are my keys? I don’t have time! Why am I always late? Is that due now?! Does this sound like you?

In the land of perfect order (wherever that land may be), keys are always nearby, our to do lists are completed daily, and we are always ahead of our busy schedules. Now, if this sounds like you, then you have probably ‘Marie-Kondoed’ your home or office to great effect (and admiration).

Here is a quick list of what we need to keep tidy: time; emotional, financial and management skills; the ability to plan, execute, and complete projects; prioritize easily; and not be susceptible to distractions or procrastination. An impossible dream list?!

In my eleven-year journey as a professional organizer, I’ve come to understand that many people have a hard time getting and staying organized. Most organizing books typically don’t ‘work’ for the people who need them the most. In fact, one of the first things we de-clutter when we start our work with a chronically disorganized (CD) client is her many books on how to get organized.

But if you’re the one asking the questions similar to those I posed above, I am going to bet that your workplace and homeplace contain clutter or at least feel disorganized, or both. And I imagine that clutter and chaos have been a part of your life for nearly the whole of your life. Being late or having clutter, or both, is likely having a negative impact on your life. No matter how hard you try, you can’t seem to maintain anything that looks like organized space. Hence, the chronic-ness of chronic disorganization.

My CD clients are particularly intellectual. They are successful, creative, talented, and people-oriented, with a broad range of knowledge and a wide range of interests. Many are fun and funny, compassionate, kind, considerate people. My chronically disorganized clients may have been diagnosed with ADHD, and/or depression, and/or other brain-based or neurological conditions. And they likely have a lousy sense of time. And honestly…I can’t think of a single book that will knock the chronic-ness out of their disorganization.

But I do have some ideas about thinking differently about the mess and clutter. First, if anything here resonates, become more curious about your brain and how you’re wired, starting with understanding your relationship with time. Google “time management for ADHD” even if you don’t have ADHD. The tips and strategies are useful to everyone. Second, if physical clutter is a problem, hire a professional organizer who is familiar with chronic disorganization. I’m not kidding. It’s a thing. De-clutter your entire house then schedule follow-up maintenance appointments until you start getting the hang of it. Third, look at your entire to-do list through the lens of delegation. What must come off of your plate and who else can do it?

Finally, and this is big, consider delegating the “emotional labor” parts of your life. Professional women are beginning to outsource a chunk of the physical labor required to manage a household (laundry and housecleaning services, grocery/meal delivery, etc.), but part of the territory of being a woman (professional or otherwise) has everything to do with the management of that which is not the physical labor of the household such as: grocery lists, pharmacy pick-ups, family birthdays, cupcakes, sympathy cards. The list is endless. Truly. For fun, ask your spouse or partner to list all the things they do around the house. You do the same. Now compare. What can you two agree on that will help even up the lists somewhat?

With some effort, concentration, and the support of a good professional organizer, habits and behaviors associated with CD actually do change. Best advice: focus on what you’re good at and/or what you enjoy, then delegate the rest. Your keys are calling!

 

5 Women Instagram At-Home Trainers To Follow

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woman fitness instructor in workout position on the floor

Just because we’re practicing social distancing, it doesn’t mean we can’t work out. Our top five Instagram fitness instructors will help you get fit without any gym equipment:

  • @doyourrumble: Julia and Andy Stern are an Instagram fitness couple who showcase their cardio and strength workouts, especially through boxing. As COVID-19 has ordered many to isolate themselves, the two have taken to hosting daily, live training sessions on their Instagram page.

    Their workouts are mostly cardio and strength training, but all of it can be done without owning any type of gym equipment.

  • @theunderbellyyoga: Jessyman Stanley is a body positive writer, podcaster and yoga extraordinaire.

    She lives by the motto: “Yoga is for Every Body” and is currently offering a two-week free trial for her online yoga program.

  • @kayla_itsines: Kayla Itsines is a fitness trainer who understands what it’s like to balance the responsibility of being a mom with the responsibility of taking care of your body. Her Instagram is full of wonderful fitness routines.

    Itsines is also the owner of the free app, SWEAT: Kayla Itsines Fitness, the No. 1 fitness app for women.

  • @emilyskyefit: Emily Skye is the fitness and health instructor for the FIT Program, an online workout resource.

    Emily manages to teach others to stay fit while not only balancing the typical challenges from self-isolation but also doing so with a toddler and a baby on the way. Currently, the FIT Program is offering a 30-day free trial of fitness and health instruction.

  • @jenselter: Jen Selter is an online health and fitness trainer who does much of her training sessions with the @fitplan_app.

    Currently, she is holding Instagram fitness sessions of easy-at-home workouts on her Instagram stories to stay healthy in a time of isolation.

Natalie Rodgers
Professional WOMAN’s Magazine contributing writer

6 ways to learn a foreign language for free while you’re sheltering in place for COVID-19

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smart afro american girl entrepreneur use computer, work training company career development seminar sit table hold takeout mug coffee in office

Your always-home lifestyle presents an unparalleled opportunity to expand your language skills. Why not go immersive? French radio! German podcasts! Spanish recipes for dinner!

Or, you know, just brush up. Much of the world is stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic, and right now, the best intensive language programs in the world are free:

  • Rosetta Stone. The grandfather of language companies is offering free three-month subscriptions to learn any of 22 languages.
  • Babbel. The course hub just opened up three months of free classes in a dozen languages.
  • Fable Cottage. These fun audio and video stories in French, German, Spanish, and Italian are usually locked under subscription, but are now freely accessible.
  • Conjuguemos. This teachers’ mecca of games, activities, and worksheets in seven languages (including Latin and Korean) is perfect for building an awesome curriculum of the nuts and bolts—verbs, grammar, and vocab. Free during the outbreak.
  • iCulture. Don’t miss Carnegie Learning’s immersion package of videos, articles, and songs in French, Spanish, or German, which are free through June.
  • Mango. The company provides high-speed learning in 70 languages for companies and schools. Its online language portal is freely accessible.

Bonne chance!

Continue on to Fast Company to read the complete article.

Feeling Brave? Here Are Some of Americans’ Most Bizarre Food Combos to Try in Lockdown

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French Fries and Ice Cream

Pickles wrapped in cheese, popcorn with beans, and ice cream on meatloaf, are just a few of the surprising food combinations Americans said they loved.

According to a survey of 2,000 American adults in California, Texas, New York, Hawaii, and Florida, these connoisseurs also said that mayo and peanut butter sandwiches, and cookies dipped in guacamole, are some of their favorite bizarre meals.

The survey aimed to uncover the most unusual food combinations Americans enjoy—as well as the characteristics coinciding with them—and yielded other otherworldly answers, including meatballs and mayo, octopus and roasted bell peppers, and alligator and fries.

Others found their go-to combinations while dining at a restaurant (36%) or via social media (33%)—and three in four are proud to share their unexpected food mashups with others.

While some combinations are quirky, others are classics: the survey found the most popular food combo Americans love is dipping their french fries in their chocolate milkshake.

Other top combinations were chocolate and popcorn (44%) or sour cream-and-onion chips with chocolate (36%).

Over a quarter (26%) of respondents can’t eat a meal without adding hot sauce to it while 27% can’t imagine eating a meal without mayonnaise. Beyond hot sauce and mayo, another 28% won’t eat a meal without a salt shaker handy.

TOP 10 MOST POPULAR—AND PERHAPS CRAZY—FOOD COMBINATIONS
1. French fries and chocolate milkshake 55%
2. Cottage cheese and fruit 50%
3. Fruit preserves with cheese and crackers 47%
4. Chocolate and popcorn 45%
5. Peanut butter and apple 44%
6. Sauerkraut and cheese 43%
7. Cheddar cheese and apple pie 42%
8. French fries and pickles 37%
9. Cold pizza and ranch dressing 36%
10. Sour cream and onion chips and chocolate 36%

Also interesting, over half of those surveyed said they’ll have a “freak out” if their different foods touch each other while on their plate.

39% of those surveyed said they sometimes choose to eat their dessert first while 41% skip breakfast altogether to enjoy a larger lunch instead.

Continue on to the Good News Network to read the complete article.

Celebrating International Women’s Day

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Celebrating International Women's Day

Collective action and shared ownership for driving gender parity are what make International Women’s Day—observed on March 8—successful.

Gloria Steinem, world-renowned feminist, journalist and activist, once explained, “The story of women’s struggle for equality belongs to no single feminist nor to any one organization but to the collective efforts of all who care about human rights.”

 

So, make International Women’s Day your day, and do what you can to truly make a positive difference for women.

#EachforEqual #IWD2020

In light of International Women’s Day, take a look at these powerful women around the world making strides in all walks of life.

Sahle-Work Zewde

In October 2018, Zewde became the first female president of Ethiopia. She is currently the only acting female head of state in Africa.

PHOTO BY MINASSE WONDIMU HAILU/ANADOLU AGENCY/GETTY IMAGES
ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA – MARCH 08: Ethiopia’s President Sahle-Work Zewde makes a speech during an event organized by Ethiopian Airlines to mark the International Women’s Day at Skylight Hotel in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on March 8, 2019.
(Photo by Minasse Wondimu Hailu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Rania Nashar

Nashar is the first female CEO of Saudi commercial bank, Samba Financial Group. She became CEO at a time when Saudi Arabia was beginning to implement reforms that will promote gender equality as part of their Vision 2030.

Credit: FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP via Getty Images
British Prime Minister Theresa May (R) attends a meeting with Rania Nashar, chief executive of Samba Financial Group, at the Saudi Stock Exchange in the capital Riyadh on April 4, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / FAYEZ NURELDINE (Photo credit should read FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP via Getty Images)

Ana Brnabic

Brnabic is the first female and first openly gay Prime Minister of traditionally conservative Serbia.

PHOTO BY MAJA HITIJ/GETTY IMAGES
BERLIN, GERMANY – SEPTEMBER 18: Serbian Prime Minister Ana Brnabic speaks at a a press conference after a meeting with the German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the Chancellery in Berlin on September 18, 2019 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Maja Hitij/Getty Images)

Greta Thunberg

Greta Thunberg, a Swedish teen with Asperger’s who became a global conscience for climate change and environmental activism, has been named TIME Magazine’s Person of the Year for 2019. She is the world’s most notable and youngest climate change activist.

Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg
Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg attends a session at the Congres center during the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, on January 21, 2020. (Photo by Fabrice COFFRINI / AFP) (Photo by FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP via Getty Images)

Najiah Knight

Najiah Knight is 13-year-old professional bull rider. Najiah is a Native American of Paiute and Klamath ancestry from Arlington, Oregon. She was the only female bull rider at the MBR tour (Mini Bull Riders tour). She recently landed her first endorsement, Ariat boots—a major and longtime sponsor of PBR, Professional Bull Riders.

Bull rider Najiah Knight
NEW YORK, NY – JANUARY 05: Bull rider Najiah Knight poses for a photo during the 2020 Professional Bull Riders Monster Energy Buck Off at the Garden at Madison Square Garden on January 5, 2020 in New York City. (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images)

Brooke Neblett

Brooke Neblett, president and CEO of FYI – For Your Information Inc. and Federal Hill Consulting LLC, won the 2020 Enterprising Women of the Year Award. The Enterprising Women of the Year Award is widely considered one of the most prestigious recognition programs for women business owners. To win, nominees must demonstrate that they have fast-growth businesses, mentor or actively support other women and girls involved in entrepreneurship and stand out as leaders in their communities.

Brooke Neblett
2020 Enterprising Women of the Year Awardee–FYI – For Your Information, Inc.

Remembering Leila Janah & Mary Higgins Clark

Leila Janah
PHOTO BY ASTRID STAWIARZ/GETTY IMAGES FOR TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL

Entrepreneur Leila Janah, who strived to create job opportunities for the world’s poorest communities, passed away on January 24. She was 37. In 2008, Janah founded Samasource in Kenya, which now employs more than 2,900 people in Kenya, Uganda, and India. The company has helped more than 50,000 people lift themselves out of poverty and has become one of the largest employers in East Africa.

Mary Higgins-Clark attends BookExpo America
NEW YORK, NY – MAY 28: Mary Higgins-Clark attends BookExpo America 2015 at Jacob Javits Center on May 28, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by John Lamparski/WireImage)

Mary Higgins Clark, the Queen of Suspense, passed away on January 31 at age 92. The notable author wrote more than more than 50 books—which all became bestsellers—and was an idol to a generation of mystery writers and readers.

Sources: Samasource ntd.com slate.com Forbes.com CNN.com TimeMagazine.com

What Makes a Great Innovator?

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Young woman presenting her idea to colleagues using her iPad

By Jessica Day

Are you an innovator? Many people have a pretty narrow definition of an innovator. They assume that if they don’t invent things and hold multiple patents, they aren’t very innovative.

In reality, many inventors don’t have patents or products.

Some innovators generate ideas, others bring those ideas to reality, while still others are advocates, leaders, and champions of great ideas. When you think of it this way, you might realize you’re innovative after all.

No matter the role, great innovators share some qualities. If you recognize these qualities in yourself, you may need to give yourself more credit! If you’re looking to become a great innovator, these are the qualities to develop.

Innovators Value Innovation
This might seem obvious, but it’s not. Many organizations value stability and consistency more than innovation and change. Innovators realize that innovation is the only way to remain truly competitive, and they share that feeling with others. As a result, they value innovation and help others to do the same.

Encouragement of Risk-Taking
Innovators realize that taking risks is part of making great discoveries and advancing society. Great innovators encourage risk-taking in others. A culture of risk-taking means encouraging new ideas and being gentle with failure, seeing it as an opportunity to learn rather than an occasion of punishment.

Innovators Teach Others
Great innovators realize that new ideas and implementation can’t end with them. They bring others along on the journey, training them how to think in new ways. In this way, they build entire teams of forward-thinkers. When innovation best practices and mindsets are shared widely, entire industries can benefit.

Start Somewhere
Too many people feel like they can’t move forward with an idea until they are sure it’s the absolute best. Great innovators realize they won’t know what ideas are great until they try them. In fact, they’re not afraid of bad ideas because they know that good ideas are usually close behind! To become an innovator, begin with the idea you have and be open to learning more.

Innovators Look for Patterns Everywhere
Innovators are always on the lookout for analogous solutions. That is, solutions that exist in one industry that may help them with theirs. A perfect example is skis. A ski company wanted to reduce the vibration in skis as skiers turned at high speeds. They found an analogous solution in the music industry and appropriated technology used to stabilize violins to reduce the ski’s vibrations. Look for ideas everywhere!

Staying Positive
As an innovator, you have to keep a good attitude. You can’t assume that something won’t work simply because it hasn’t been done that way before. Innovators realize that if you do what you’ve always done, you get what you’ve always gotten. Stay positive, and you’ll see new ideas work out in surprising ways.

Innovators Incentivize Innovation
Just like innovators take others under their wing to teach them how to innovate, they also incentivize those who are willing to innovate. You might assume every organization does this, but the reality is many companies will discourage or even punish those who try to suggest doing things in a new way. Instead, build incentive programs that encourage new ideas!

Being a Team Player
The stereotype of an innovator as a trouble-maker that no one enjoys working with is false. A great innovator realizes that a team is involved and does his or her best to be a team player. Rather than being difficult mavericks, great innovators are team players who bring others along with them on implementing new ideas.

Innovators Connect and Collaborate
In the Renaissance, often viewed as the peak of innovation in Western society, most people worked alone. Less than 10 percent of the innovation during the Renaissance was networked. Whereas, now, a majority of breakthroughs happen in collaborative environments. Expect to work with others to create breakthroughs.

Innovators Value a Culture of Innovation
As an innovator, you realize that you can’t “go it alone” because you want and need the innovation and new ideas to go beyond your department and direct influence. Great innovators help create a culture of innovation in their whole organization so that innovation has a greater reach. Having a culture of innovation benefits not only an organization but also the industry, and even society, as a whole.

Being an innovator means a lot more than being Benjamin Franklin or a mad scientist. Day to day, great innovators encourage risk-taking, teach others, collaborate and build teams, and much more. Do you see yourself as an innovator now?

Source: ideascale.com

Adelfa Callejo sculpture, Dallas’ first of a Latina, expected to land downtown in Main Street Garden park

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bronze statue of Adelfa Callejo

The bronze statue of Adelfa Callejo, a staunch civil rights advocate believed to be the first practicing Latina lawyer in Dallas, will soon land in a downtown park — right next to the University of North Texas Dallas College of Law and the municipal court building.

A Dallas City Council committee on Tuesday accepted the $100,000 sculpture as a donation with plans to place it in Main Street Garden. It would be Dallas’ first sculpture of a Latina, according to city staffers.

Dallas city officials and the Botello-Callejo Foundation Board agreed to the new location after Mayor Pro Tem Adam Medrano quietly delayed the plan to place it in the lobby of the Dallas Love Field Airport, which is in his district. Medrano didn’t respond to requests for comment Tuesday.

The Dallas City Council is expected to approve the donation at its Feb. 12 meeting. The board wanted to tie the sculpture’s public unveiling to the six-year anniversary of Callejo’s death, which was in January 2014, after a battle with brain cancer.

The foundation’s board commissioned the roughly 1,000-pound piece by Mexican artist Germán Michel shortly after she died. It is currently being stored in a Dallas warehouse.

Callejo’s nephew J.D. Gonzales said he was thrilled the sculpture will be downtown near the university, where it’ll be visible to students and attest to her trailblazing in education and law.

“I hope that what Adelfa stood for, and what she did and what she accomplished lives on forever,” Gonzales said.

Monica Lira Bravo, chairwoman of the Botello-Callejo Foundation Board, said she met with Medrano and Council member Omar Narvaez last month to discuss where to place the sculpture.

Lira Bravo said she suggested Main Street Garden Park as an alternative after the two council members expressed concerns over the Dallas Love Field Airport option.

Continue on to the Dallas Morning News to read the complete article.

What is malware and why should I be concerned?

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Young people watching a live streaming on social media

In the era of Social media, our privacy and online safety becomes increasingly important. We’re sharing our lives online; however, we should also know how much is too much and how to save our private data from unwanted intrusion.

The point is, our private information is valuable to cybercriminals who use it to deprive us of our hard-earned money and even ruin our reputation by stealing our identity. Leaving our data “up for grabs” means we might have a difficult time applying for a home loan or even get a passport.

With this being said, it’s essential to know what kinds of dangers lurk around, being able to recognize it and protect ourselves from cyber-attacks.

That’s why we decided to explain thoroughly what is malware, what types of it exist, and how to ensure our data, privacy, and devices are safe.

What is Malware, and why is it so important?

“Malware” refers to malicious software, used to describe any software (or code for that matter) made to inflict damage on mobile and desktop devices by exploiting those devices or data they carry, without the consent of their owners. Malware is usually made to achieve some financial gain – whether it’s about seeking victim’s financial data, holding a computer for ransom, or taking it over in order to rent it out for malicious purposes to others. Without exception, every type of Malware involves some form of payment to the cybercriminal.

There are plenty of ways we can “adopt” Malware on our computers or mobile devices. Some of them include opening the attachment of the “infected” person, clicking on the link which automatically downloads a virus, or even clicking on an ad banner on a website.

He loves me; he loves me NOT.

It’s hard to talk about Malware without mentioning the ILOVEYOU virus, which caused immense damage in 2009. Considered as the most destructive virus of all time, the ILOVEYOU virus used to rename all files in the affected device with “Iloveyou” until the system crashed. Fast-forward to the present day; there’s an increased number of hackers using destructive Malware (Between 2017 and 2018, there was a total increase of 25 percent only) for malicious acts.

Is there a reason to be afraid?

For the ones wondering if they should be afraid of Malware, the answer is a loud: YES! Technology advanced so much that we’re basically carrying small computers in our pockets – in fact, more and more cyber attacks are connected to mobile devices. What’s more, it’s so easy to lose all our important data: text messages, apps we download and failing to update our OS is all the ways we become prone to cyber-attacks. It’s scary and devastating to know someone could ruin our reputation and finances with one single click.

Knowledge is the key.

Now when we have a clear picture of what Malware is, we should get familiar with different types of it. Then, armed with knowledge, we will be able to protect ourselves and our data from malicious cyber intruders. There are six types of malware: spyware, adware, scareware, ransomware, worms, and trojans. Now, we’re going to go through them and offer you a complete overview.

Spyware is not here to harm our computers but follow our every move instead. It attaches itself to executable files and once it is downloaded it completely takes over the control. It can track anything from passwords to financial data.

Adware presents itself in a form of pop-ads or unclosable windows. Luckily, adware doesn’t steal our data, but it tries to make us click on fraudulent ads. Furthermore, it can slow down our computer severely by taking our bandwidth.

Scareware looks and feels like adware, but its main goal is to make us buy software we don’t need by scaring us. Usually, scareware ads tell us our computer has a virus and we need to buy software to get rid of it.

Ransomware resembles hacker moves we’re used to seeing in the movies. Once is on our computer it encrypts our files and holds our information hostage until we pay them a fee to decrypt it.

Worms resemble viruses, however, they don’t need human intervention to get transmitted to another computer. Instead, they use security flaws to do it.

Trojans are designed to allow hackers to take over our computers. Usually, they are downloaded from rogue websites.

We should learn how to protect ourselves.

Now when we know what are the types of malware out there, we will know how to recognize it and protect our precious data and valuable info from cybercriminals. To avoid malware, we should make sure we’re not downloading and running any program from popup windows. Furthermore, we should check our OS is updated and be careful not to open any email attachments from unknown people. Other ways include avoiding the use of public WiFi networks, sharing data while connected on public WiFi and avoid opening emails and attachments from untrusted sources.