Miss USA, Miss Teen USA, Miss America Are All Black Women For First Time In Pageant History

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Chelsie Kryst miss usa winner poses on stage smiling holding bouquet of flowers

Cheslie Kryst contributed to pageant history when she was crowned Miss USA on Thursday: For the first time, Miss USA, Miss Teen USA and Miss America are all black women.

Kryst, who represented North Carolina in the pageant, is a lawyer who practices civil litigation and does pro bono work to help get reduced sentences for incarcerated people.

Miss Teen USA 2019, Kaliegh Garris, was crowned Sunday. The high school senior from Connecticut plans to attend college and pursue a degree in nursing. Miss America 2019 Nia Franklin, who won her competition in September, hailed from New York.

Both Kryst and Garris were applauded for wearing their natural hair during their pageants.

“There were a few naysayers saying, ‘You look better with straight hair,’ or ‘You should put in extensions and straighten your natural hair,’” Garris told Refinery 29, later adding, “I feel more confident and comfortable with my natural hair.”

Both Miss USA, Nana Meriweather, and Miss Teen USA, Logan West, were black in 2012. But Miss America that year, Laura Kaeppeler, was not.

At Thursday’s final Miss USA event, Kryst expertly answered a question on whether the Me Too and Time’s Up movements against sexual harassment and assault had “gone too far.”

“I don’t think these movements have gone too far,” she said. “What Me Too and Time’s Up are about are making sure that we foster safe and inclusive workplaces in our country.”

“As an attorney, that’s exactly what I want to hear,” she added. “That’s exactly what I want for this country.”

Continue on to Black Voices to read the complete article.

What Makes a Great Innovator?

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Young woman presenting her idea to colleagues using her iPad

By Jessica Day

Are you an innovator? Many people have a pretty narrow definition of an innovator. They assume that if they don’t invent things and hold multiple patents, they aren’t very innovative.

In reality, many inventors don’t have patents or products.

Some innovators generate ideas, others bring those ideas to reality, while still others are advocates, leaders, and champions of great ideas. When you think of it this way, you might realize you’re innovative after all.

No matter the role, great innovators share some qualities. If you recognize these qualities in yourself, you may need to give yourself more credit! If you’re looking to become a great innovator, these are the qualities to develop.

Innovators Value Innovation
This might seem obvious, but it’s not. Many organizations value stability and consistency more than innovation and change. Innovators realize that innovation is the only way to remain truly competitive, and they share that feeling with others. As a result, they value innovation and help others to do the same.

Encouragement of Risk-Taking
Innovators realize that taking risks is part of making great discoveries and advancing society. Great innovators encourage risk-taking in others. A culture of risk-taking means encouraging new ideas and being gentle with failure, seeing it as an opportunity to learn rather than an occasion of punishment.

Innovators Teach Others
Great innovators realize that new ideas and implementation can’t end with them. They bring others along on the journey, training them how to think in new ways. In this way, they build entire teams of forward-thinkers. When innovation best practices and mindsets are shared widely, entire industries can benefit.

Start Somewhere
Too many people feel like they can’t move forward with an idea until they are sure it’s the absolute best. Great innovators realize they won’t know what ideas are great until they try them. In fact, they’re not afraid of bad ideas because they know that good ideas are usually close behind! To become an innovator, begin with the idea you have and be open to learning more.

Innovators Look for Patterns Everywhere
Innovators are always on the lookout for analogous solutions. That is, solutions that exist in one industry that may help them with theirs. A perfect example is skis. A ski company wanted to reduce the vibration in skis as skiers turned at high speeds. They found an analogous solution in the music industry and appropriated technology used to stabilize violins to reduce the ski’s vibrations. Look for ideas everywhere!

Staying Positive
As an innovator, you have to keep a good attitude. You can’t assume that something won’t work simply because it hasn’t been done that way before. Innovators realize that if you do what you’ve always done, you get what you’ve always gotten. Stay positive, and you’ll see new ideas work out in surprising ways.

Innovators Incentivize Innovation
Just like innovators take others under their wing to teach them how to innovate, they also incentivize those who are willing to innovate. You might assume every organization does this, but the reality is many companies will discourage or even punish those who try to suggest doing things in a new way. Instead, build incentive programs that encourage new ideas!

Being a Team Player
The stereotype of an innovator as a trouble-maker that no one enjoys working with is false. A great innovator realizes that a team is involved and does his or her best to be a team player. Rather than being difficult mavericks, great innovators are team players who bring others along with them on implementing new ideas.

Innovators Connect and Collaborate
In the Renaissance, often viewed as the peak of innovation in Western society, most people worked alone. Less than 10 percent of the innovation during the Renaissance was networked. Whereas, now, a majority of breakthroughs happen in collaborative environments. Expect to work with others to create breakthroughs.

Innovators Value a Culture of Innovation
As an innovator, you realize that you can’t “go it alone” because you want and need the innovation and new ideas to go beyond your department and direct influence. Great innovators help create a culture of innovation in their whole organization so that innovation has a greater reach. Having a culture of innovation benefits not only an organization but also the industry, and even society, as a whole.

Being an innovator means a lot more than being Benjamin Franklin or a mad scientist. Day to day, great innovators encourage risk-taking, teach others, collaborate and build teams, and much more. Do you see yourself as an innovator now?

Source: ideascale.com

You’re most likely to be single at 40 if you have one of these jobs

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People can be workaholics. Sometimes work becomes so hectic that people can block out everything else in their life—including love—in hopes of making a successful career for themselves.

There’s nothing wrong with that. In fact, being single longer is a trending topic in today’s society. There are plenty of benefits of staying single and marrying later in life.

Being financially independent, creating a successful career for yourself, and building a strong network of friends and coworkers are just a few of the things one can focus on if they’re not wrapped up in a committed relationship.

That’s not to say those things are impossible if someone is married, either. There’s just a lot of time that tends to be invested in those serious relationships that could be used for other things by single people.

Still, the thought of one being single later into their life made us wonder—what types of work are these people in that has them so wrapped up? We looked through some census data to see which jobs are most common for single people at age 40.

Top 10 jobs where you’re most likely to be single at 40

  • Bartenders: 74%
  • Tile installers: 73%
  • Food servers, nonrestaurant: 69%
  • Tour and travel guides: 65%
  • Parts salespersons: 64%
  • Personal-care workers: 63%
  • Flight attendants: 61%
  • Veterinary assistants: 61%
  • Postal-service mail workers: 60%
  • Food batch makers: 60%
  • Many of these professions seem to fall within industries with the highest turnover. A possible explanation for this could be that workers are so concentrated on their craft and making their careers as stable as possible that they cannot fit a serious relationship into their personal life schedule.

    A lot of these positions also offer the opportunity to travel for work, too, so people may believe that they’re better off traveling solo than bringing a partner along.

    Finally, a fair amount of the jobs listed have a commission aspect to them. There may be incentive to work longer hours with the opportunity to be paid more, again decreasing the opportunity workers have to enter a serious relationship.

    A logical reason why so many bartenders tend to remain single is that the majority of their income comes from their patrons’ tips—which can be increased with a little friendly flirtation. That’s definitely not a bad thing. Bartenders in some of the bigger cities are raking in six figures annually.

    Continue on to Fast Company to read the complete article.

    How to decide if your social circle needs an upgrade in 2020

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    Group of diverse co-workers standing around talking

    You’re the average of the five people you spend the most time with, motivational speaker John Rohn once said. If you’re not happy with your current situation at work, you may want to take a closer look at your inner circle.

    “We have to be really good at [deciding] who we allow into our life,” says Ivan Misner, author of Who’s In Your Room: The Secret to Creating Your Best Life and founder of the global business network BNI. “Imagine your life is one room and the room had one door. The door could only let people enter, and once they’re in the room, they’re there forever.”

    It’s a scary metaphor, but it’s true, says Misner. “Think about a person you let into your life and then had to let out because they were toxic, difficult, or angry,” he says. “If you can remember the emotions and what they did, they’re still in your head. If they’re in your head, they’re still in your room.”

    For this reason, it’s important to surround yourself with the right people from the start—or they’ll be in your “room” for the rest of your life.

    “When you realize that this happens, you can get better at screening out people before they get in and dealing with the ones you already let in,” says Misner.

    Letting people in

    Opening the door to the right people means getting clear with your values. “If you don’t know your values, you don’t know where to start,” says Misner.

    Start with deal breakers—behaviors that you hate, such as dishonesty or drama. Look for people who demonstrate these behaviors, and don’t let them into your social circle.

    “Pretend your mind has a doorman or bouncer,” says Misner. “Train your doorman—your subconscious and conscious mind—to identify people with these behaviors. By understanding your deal breakers, you’ll be better able to start understanding your values.”

    A common mistake people make when letting others in is weighing too quickly “what’s in it for me” and disregarding the things that go against their values. When we make decisions based on short-sighted gains, we also choose values that don’t resonate with who we are.

    “In physics, resonance is a powerful thing,” says Misner. “It’s a phenomenon that occurs when an extra force drives something to oscillate at a specific frequency.”

    To understand how it works, imagine two pianos sitting side by side in a room. “If you hit the middle C key on one piano while someone presses the sustain pedal on the other one, the middle C of the other one will vibrate on that second piano, without [it] being touched,” says Misner. “That’s resonance. People are like that.”

    When you make a decision based on what you think we can get instead of your values, you invite values that don’t align with yours to resonate in your life.

    “Be mindful about creating relationships with resonance and get your values down,” says Misner. “Companies often recognize the importance of knowing your values, but people don’t always think about them. Values should be at the foundation of everything you do. Otherwise, you’ll create the wrong room.”

    Dealing with people you’ve already let in

    If you have people in your circle that are creating a bad environment, decide if they have to be there or if you can exit the relationship. If they must be there, it’s time to draw a line in sand.

    “Evaluating your social circle means recognizing that someone may be in your life but their baggage needs to stay out,” says Misner. “Draw a line in the sand by saying that you’re not letting their behavior continue around you.”

    For example, if you have a coworker who demonstrates toxic behavior such as frequent gossiping or complaining, establish boundaries. Say, “Starting now, if you start talking badly, I will walk away. I respect you and will talk to you again, but only if you can have a mature adult conversation.” Then follow through. It may take a while for the person to understand the new boundaries and rules, but once you draw the line in the sand, you can eliminate the toxicity from your circle.

    “Stand firm,” says Misner. “Part of that is learning how to say ‘no.’

    Continue on to Fast Company to read the complete article.

    What Women Want At Work

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    Generation Z is set to make up over a third of the workforce in 2020, and the oldest of the generation are settling into their careers, or are already moving into their next roles. At Fairygodboss, the largest career community for women, we took a look at what Gen Z women expect from employers, managers, and companies as well as their general opinions about the workplace and their careers.

    A surprising and significant takeaway from the survey was the value, or lack thereof, that Gen Z places on long-term, professional relationships. Most notably, over half of the survey respondents have never had an internship and almost a third think you don’t need any internship experience to land a job. And once landing the job, over half (55%) of respondents said that they plan to stay or stayed in their first full-time position for less than four years, and almost a quarter (24%) reported planning to stay or staying for less than a year.

    A crucial part of establishing yourself as a professional in an industry is building a strong network, which is typically something that takes time and requires more long-term professional relationships. Not to say that a person can’t build a network while they’re hopping between jobs or even working for themselves. Many individuals can prove this to be true. But it does suggest a major change in the future of career development for this new generation of the workforce.

    There’s a well-known statement that 80% of jobs are never posted, meaning that having a robust network may help you get a leg up on these “hidden” opportunities and give you a better chance at accessing them. Yet, from our research, we found that the number one way Gen Z women reported looking for their most recent job or internship was through an online jobs board, followed by their college or university jobs board.

    Not to discount the value of a network, the third and fourth most popular ways respondents found their positions were through friends and connection referrals, but when it came to researching companies, Gen Z women still rely on digital sources like the company website (69%), social media (49%), and company review websites (44%) as their main sources of information. To sum it up: Gen Z women don’t believe it’s who you know, but rather it’s what you know that matters.

    While the notion of changing jobs one or more times in the span of a few years is a foreign concept for some individuals, it may actually stand to benefit this new generation of workers. Overwhelmingly, throughout the survey, we found that the aspect of any job that respondents value most is the compensation. Sixty-three percent of female respondents said the most important quality they look for in a company is that it pays well. When asked if they could only have one thing at their next or first full-time job, 53% of respondents said they want a high salary. This may also explain why over half of respondents have never had an internship where the pay is very low or, sometimes, even nonexistent.

    Perhaps changing jobs is the best way to get that desired high salary. Research has shown that when individuals stay in their jobs for too long they may actually lose money, as compared to if they changed jobs. When you accept a base salary for a position, you can only receive raises based on a certain percentage of that salary. If you’re a master negotiator, you might be able to get the raise you want every time, but for many others, the only way to get a 10% or 20% (or more) pay increase is to change jobs where you can ask for a higher starting salary.

    It will be interesting to watch as Gen Z continues to enter the workforce and make up a larger portion of working individuals and see how their opinions change, or if they stay the same. Members of this generation are only beginning their careers, so they’re here for the long haul–although maybe not too long.

    Continue on to Fast Company to read the complete article.

    Adelfa Callejo sculpture, Dallas’ first of a Latina, expected to land downtown in Main Street Garden park

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    bronze statue of Adelfa Callejo

    The bronze statue of Adelfa Callejo, a staunch civil rights advocate believed to be the first practicing Latina lawyer in Dallas, will soon land in a downtown park — right next to the University of North Texas Dallas College of Law and the municipal court building.

    A Dallas City Council committee on Tuesday accepted the $100,000 sculpture as a donation with plans to place it in Main Street Garden. It would be Dallas’ first sculpture of a Latina, according to city staffers.

    Dallas city officials and the Botello-Callejo Foundation Board agreed to the new location after Mayor Pro Tem Adam Medrano quietly delayed the plan to place it in the lobby of the Dallas Love Field Airport, which is in his district. Medrano didn’t respond to requests for comment Tuesday.

    The Dallas City Council is expected to approve the donation at its Feb. 12 meeting. The board wanted to tie the sculpture’s public unveiling to the six-year anniversary of Callejo’s death, which was in January 2014, after a battle with brain cancer.

    The foundation’s board commissioned the roughly 1,000-pound piece by Mexican artist Germán Michel shortly after she died. It is currently being stored in a Dallas warehouse.

    Callejo’s nephew J.D. Gonzales said he was thrilled the sculpture will be downtown near the university, where it’ll be visible to students and attest to her trailblazing in education and law.

    “I hope that what Adelfa stood for, and what she did and what she accomplished lives on forever,” Gonzales said.

    Monica Lira Bravo, chairwoman of the Botello-Callejo Foundation Board, said she met with Medrano and Council member Omar Narvaez last month to discuss where to place the sculpture.

    Lira Bravo said she suggested Main Street Garden Park as an alternative after the two council members expressed concerns over the Dallas Love Field Airport option.

    Continue on to the Dallas Morning News to read the complete article.

    What is malware and why should I be concerned?

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    In the era of Social media, our privacy and online safety becomes increasingly important. We’re sharing our lives online; however, we should also know how much is too much and how to save our private data from unwanted intrusion.

    The point is, our private information is valuable to cybercriminals who use it to deprive us of our hard-earned money and even ruin our reputation by stealing our identity. Leaving our data “up for grabs” means we might have a difficult time applying for a home loan or even get a passport.

    With this being said, it’s essential to know what kinds of dangers lurk around, being able to recognize it and protect ourselves from cyber-attacks.

    That’s why we decided to explain thoroughly what is malware, what types of it exist, and how to ensure our data, privacy, and devices are safe.

    What is Malware, and why is it so important?

    “Malware” refers to malicious software, used to describe any software (or code for that matter) made to inflict damage on mobile and desktop devices by exploiting those devices or data they carry, without the consent of their owners. Malware is usually made to achieve some financial gain – whether it’s about seeking victim’s financial data, holding a computer for ransom, or taking it over in order to rent it out for malicious purposes to others. Without exception, every type of Malware involves some form of payment to the cybercriminal.

    There are plenty of ways we can “adopt” Malware on our computers or mobile devices. Some of them include opening the attachment of the “infected” person, clicking on the link which automatically downloads a virus, or even clicking on an ad banner on a website.

    He loves me; he loves me NOT.

    It’s hard to talk about Malware without mentioning the ILOVEYOU virus, which caused immense damage in 2009. Considered as the most destructive virus of all time, the ILOVEYOU virus used to rename all files in the affected device with “Iloveyou” until the system crashed. Fast-forward to the present day; there’s an increased number of hackers using destructive Malware (Between 2017 and 2018, there was a total increase of 25 percent only) for malicious acts.

    Is there a reason to be afraid?

    For the ones wondering if they should be afraid of Malware, the answer is a loud: YES! Technology advanced so much that we’re basically carrying small computers in our pockets – in fact, more and more cyber attacks are connected to mobile devices. What’s more, it’s so easy to lose all our important data: text messages, apps we download and failing to update our OS is all the ways we become prone to cyber-attacks. It’s scary and devastating to know someone could ruin our reputation and finances with one single click.

    Knowledge is the key.

    Now when we have a clear picture of what Malware is, we should get familiar with different types of it. Then, armed with knowledge, we will be able to protect ourselves and our data from malicious cyber intruders. There are six types of malware: spyware, adware, scareware, ransomware, worms, and trojans. Now, we’re going to go through them and offer you a complete overview.

    Spyware is not here to harm our computers but follow our every move instead. It attaches itself to executable files and once it is downloaded it completely takes over the control. It can track anything from passwords to financial data.

    Adware presents itself in a form of pop-ads or unclosable windows. Luckily, adware doesn’t steal our data, but it tries to make us click on fraudulent ads. Furthermore, it can slow down our computer severely by taking our bandwidth.

    Scareware looks and feels like adware, but its main goal is to make us buy software we don’t need by scaring us. Usually, scareware ads tell us our computer has a virus and we need to buy software to get rid of it.

    Ransomware resembles hacker moves we’re used to seeing in the movies. Once is on our computer it encrypts our files and holds our information hostage until we pay them a fee to decrypt it.

    Worms resemble viruses, however, they don’t need human intervention to get transmitted to another computer. Instead, they use security flaws to do it.

    Trojans are designed to allow hackers to take over our computers. Usually, they are downloaded from rogue websites.

    We should learn how to protect ourselves.

    Now when we know what are the types of malware out there, we will know how to recognize it and protect our precious data and valuable info from cybercriminals. To avoid malware, we should make sure we’re not downloading and running any program from popup windows. Furthermore, we should check our OS is updated and be careful not to open any email attachments from unknown people. Other ways include avoiding the use of public WiFi networks, sharing data while connected on public WiFi and avoid opening emails and attachments from untrusted sources.

    What kind of questions should you ask at the end of a job interview?

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    group of people sitting outside office waiting for an interview

    It’s a scenario many of us have found ourselves in. You’re nearing the end of a job interview and finally, you can begin to relax a little. Despite the nerves, you’ve come across well and answered all the questions confidently – and with a little bit of luck, you may just be offered the position.

    Before you can run out of the room, however, the interviewer wants to know if you have any questions for them.

    It might be tempting to say no, so you can leave as quickly as possible – but asking questions can be of huge benefit when it comes to interviewing for a job.

    Firstly, it’s important to remember that interviews should always be considered a two-way street. Yes, the recruiter is interested in finding out if your skills and abilities are suited to the role in question. But a job interview is also a chance for you to work out if this is the right job for you – and if you are going to fit in well at the company.

    “As candidates, we can often get caught up in the whole process, particularly as we try to remember the answers we’ve prepared but it’s equally as important to take time towards the end of the interview to ask your own questions,” says Row Davies, HR business manager at the recruitment firm Macildowie.

    While you’re preparing for your interview and imagining the kind of questions you might be asked, it’s also useful to think about any queries you might have too. However, don’t ask an interviewer anything you can find out easily yourself, either online or on the company’s social media channels.

    “It’s crucial for you to assess whether the company is the right fit for you, as just like any relationship, both need to benefit and feel comfortable with the partnership,” Davies says.

    “Not only does the process allow you to show your enthusiasm for the company, asking questions also gives you the opportunity to check your goals and values are aligned with the business. You don’t want to be a year or more down the line and find that the company is heading in a direction that you don’t want to or perhaps can’t follow.”

    So what kind of questions should you be asking as an interview candidate?

    Davies believes there are three key questions that should be on every job applicant’s list.

    “The first, is asking the interviewer ‘is there anything regarding my experience you would like me to expand upon?’. Not only does this show that you are engaged, it also provides you with the opportunity to further emphasise your strengths and how you believe these will be an asset to the company’s objectives,” she says.

    The second is about learning and development – and specifically, whether the company is actively investing in their employees. After all, you want to know that you’re going to move forward in a job.

    “Ask, ‘how do you support the professional development of your employees?’. Answers to this question will give you an insight into how the business will support you as you progress up the career ladder,” Davies says.

    “It also shows the interviewer you have aspirations and a drive to succeed in the organization.”

    Finally, it’s a good idea to find out more about the company’s environment and whether they look after their employees.

    “I would encourage any of my candidates to ask the interviewer, ‘what do you like most about working for the company?’ This is great for building a personal connection with the interviewer, giving them the opportunity to share their personal views and the passion they have for the company,” Davies says.

    Continue on to Yahoo News to read the complete article.

    5 times it makes sense to include your high-school job on your résumé

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    Whether it was bagging groceries, manning the fast food drive-through, or babysitting, many of us had jobs in high school. Entry-level roles give us our first workplace experience and help shape our work ethic. But do they belong on a résumé?

    According to a report by recruitment software provider iCIMS, 70% of recruiters identified past work experience as being more important than an entry-level applicant’s college major. But there is not a one-size-fits-all approach for knowing how far back to go on your résumé, says Amy Warner, iCIMS director of talent acquisition.

    Think about what you want to convey to the employer,” she says. “Highlight the roles or skills that are relevant.”

    Career experts often recommend going back about 10 years on your résumé. Here are five times when adding your part-time positions to your résumé could be helpful within or even after that timeline:

    1. If the experience is relevant

    If the role is relevant and you can connect the dots to the job you’re applying for, keep it on your résumé, says William Ratliff, career services manager at Employment BOOST, a professional résumé writing and career services firm.

    “For example, a job you had bussing tables or serving coffee in college won’t help much if you’re applying for a marketing management role five years out of school,” he says. “If you’re fresh out of college with no job history, those positions can help showcase your work ethic and customer service skills, but they lose relevance as soon as your professional career begins in earnest.”

    Be strategic in how you present your customer service-oriented roles. Ratliff recommends searching job descriptions for skills and traits that crossover, like team leadership, problem-solving, financial reporting, relationship building, or anything you else you can feasibly connect to the positions.

    “Focus your résumé’s content on those skills, how you used them, and the concrete result of their application,” he says. “That way, your résumé will include the right key terms while illustrating how you benefited your former employers in those roles.”

    2. If the job was in the same industry

    Listing high school and college jobs can be helpful if they demonstrate you’re familiar with the industry, says Dr. Wanda Gravett, academic program coordinator for Walden University’s MS in Human Resource Management program.”Listing that early experience could advocate for your foundational knowledge and learning from the bottom up,” she says. “Coupled with your education, this might be a good sell and get you in the door for a low- to mid-level position.”

    Candace Nicolls, senior vice president of people and workplace at Snagajob, an hourly job marketplace, agrees. “If you’re applying for a role that’s related to an hourly job you once had, list it,” she says. “If you want to get into merchandising, list your retail experience. Mention your restaurant experience if you want to work at their corporate headquarters. Nothing teaches hustle like hourly jobs.”

    3. If you were promoted

    If you started washing dishes and worked you way up, include your experience, says Louisiana restauranteur Chris McJunkins. “If you show growth, such as starting as a busboy and making it to manager, it is something I would want to show,” he says. “Your future employer would see that you started here and were respected enough to keep getting promoted.”

    McJunkins started in the restaurant business at age 15 bussing dishes and now owns his own independent restaurant, eight Walk-On’s Sports Bistreaux locations, and one Cantina Laredo. He says if you can do restaurant work, you can do anything.

    “You deal with people on every single level, he says. “If you’re in management, you’re dealing with employees of all different educational and financial backgrounds. And you’re dealing with all levels of people with customers. You learn to communicate with people.”

    4. If you want to demonstrate work ethic

    High school or college jobs often demonstrate your level of motivation, says Dena Upton, vice president of people at Drift, a conversational marketing and sales platform. “These jobs can be a great indication of your work ethic and drive—particularly if you are early in your career,” she says.

    For example, if you were a manager of a restaurant when you were in college, it can speak to leadership experience. Or if you were a retail salesperson, it can demonstrate your customer service abilities.

    If you had a part-time job and participated in extracurricular activities, this can be especially telling, says Upton. “You shouldn’t shy away from showcasing things like sports achievements or volunteering, as not only do they paint a fuller picture of who you are and what makes you tick,” she says, “but they can be a great indication of your leadership, time management, and teamwork skills.”

    5. If you plan to talk about the job in an interview

    Employers often ask behavioral-based questions during an interview, such as “Tell me about a time when you had to deal with a difficult customer.”

    Continue on to Fast Company to read the complete article.

    Make the Most of Your Meetings!

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    Typical managers spend nearly 40 percent of their work hours in meetings, not to mention the time spent preparing (and recuperating).

    A survey of business leaders showed:

    -33 percent of time spent in meetings is unproductive.

    -75 percent of the respondents said it is “almost essential” to have an agenda, yet they use them only 50 percent of the time.

    -Only 64 percent of meetings achieve their intended outcome.

    A disciplined approach to making the most of meeting time will help to maximize team effectiveness.

    Set an objective:

    Answer these three questions.

    What, ultimately, do I want to achieve by this meeting?

    What, specifically, has to be accomplished by the end of this meeting?

    When the meeting is over, how will I know whether the meeting was a success?

    Use your answers to define your meeting’s objective. Then make participants aware of the objective up front. Make sure the key people attend are the key people and are the ones with the knowledge and experience needed to accomplish the meeting’s objective.

    Arrange for the proper facility: Little things (how the room is arranged, the room temperature, or whether there’s coffee or not) can make a tremendous difference in the success of a meeting.

    Write an agenda There are numerous ways to accomplish this task. Have a planning committee set the agenda, or send out a pre-meeting survey asking people to list one to three topics they want to discuss. When writing an agenda, put the most important items at the beginning. The agenda should be distributed far enough in advance so participants can adequately prepare for the meeting. The agenda should state the date, location, start, and finish time, topics to be covered, the expected outcome (information only, discussion, or decision).

    Make the Most of Your Meetings Advice for achieving successful business meetings time allotted to each topic. Studies show that productivity decreases sharply after about an hour and a half of meeting.

    If you must have a long meeting, provide adequate breaks.

    Keep the meeting on track Consider using a facilitator or getting a team member to serve as timekeeper. If a facilitator is not used, the meeting leader is responsible for keeping the meeting on course and adjourning on time. You could also assign meeting roles to facilitate progress such as chairperson, note taker, timekeeper, or observer.

    You might also allow the participants to suggest agreements for the meeting before the meeting begins, like those listed below.

    – One person speaks at a time
    – No side conversations
    – Everyone participates
    – Listen as an ally
    – Set time frames and stick to them
    – se a consensus decision-making model

    If, as the leader, you notice that only a few are contributing, you can direct a question to others, such as “What do you think about . . .?” Should discussion stray from the agenda, you should ask, “Is this subject relevant?” and have the group determine if it should be added to the agenda or saved for a future meeting.

    Summarize the meeting In closing, the leader should summarize the group’s accomplishments, review action items (including who, what, and when) and, thank everyone for their participation. The summary of the meeting should be appropriately documented and distributed to team members and key stakeholders.

    Reprinted with permission: The Lindenberger Group, LLC.

    Forks Up! Dig into this guilt free mac and cheese recipe that’s ready in minutes

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    mac and cheese dish on a table

    Who doesn’t love mac and cheese? Regardless of what your dietary needs or preferences might be, everyone can agree that they have a special place in their hearts for it. The creamy, ooey gooey lusciousness surrounds each noodle, keeping us coming for morsel after morsel is sometimes too much to handle (or maybe not enough?).

    We love finding new and exciting ways (especially healthy ones) that allow us to enjoy mac and cheese guilt free. And now thanks to Planta South Beach we have just the recipe to help us reach that goal.

    Not only is this recipe delicious, delectable and enticing — but it’s also great for you and the environment. Nab the recipe below and get to cooking!

    Vegan Mac And Cheese from Planta South Beach

    Ingredients:

    4 cups croutons

    1 cup almond parmesan

    4 teaspoons salt

    2 yellow onions, diced

    1 head cauliflower, chopped

    1 cup confit garlic

    3 tablespoons confit garlic oil

    2 tablespoons garlic powder

    ½ cup almond milk

    2 teaspoons lemon

    1 quart cashews

    2 tablespoons nutritional yeast

    1 cup rigatoni

    2 tablespoons green peas

    3 tablespoons smoked mushrooms

    Salt and pepper, to taste

    Instructions:

    BREAD CRUMBS

    – Crush croutons by hand until crumbled.

    – In a bowl, mix crushed croutons, almond parmesan and salt. Set aside.

    GARLIC ALFREDO SAUCE

    – Sweat onions and cauliflower in a pot with 3 tablespoons of garlic oil. Cook until translucent, season with salt.

    – Use a Vitamix or blender to combine onions, cauliflower, confit garlic, almond milk, nutritional yeast and garlic powder until smooth and set aside.

    – In a separate Vitamix or blender, mix the cashews and lemon juice until smooth. Start at a low speed and work your way up. Once mixture is smooth and creamy, slowly start to add the puree mixture.

    – Season with salt and fresh cracked pepper.

    MAC & CHEESE

    – Boil pasta for 8-10 minutes or until al dente, then drain.

    – Sauté peas and mushrooms, salt to taste.

    – Mix pasta with Garlic Alfredo Sauce until creamy.

    – Set oven to broil at 350°F. Transfer mac & cheese to baking pan and top with bread crumbs. Put in oven until golden.

    – Garnish with fresh parsley.

    Continue on to HOLA! to read the complete article.