Karlie Kloss and Teach for America team up to help 1,000 girls learn to code

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Karlie Kloss’ passion for coding hasn’t faded. And to prove it, the 25-year-old model and entrepreneur is taking her nonprofit coding program to the next level.

After taking a coding class herself, Kloss launched Kode With Klossy in 2015 in the hopes of making coding lessons more accessible to young girls and inspiring them to pursue careers in the tech industry. Now, the program is expanding its reach by launching 50 coding summer camps in 25 cities across America.

As a result, Kode With Klossy will be able to serve 1,000 girls this year between the ages of 13 and 18. The nonprofit is also partnering with Teach For America in a new initiative to train educators, so they can bring coding curricula back to their own communities.

“I initially took a coding class because I wanted to understand what this language I kept hearing about was,” Kloss said, explaining that she didn’t originally set out to start a nonprofit.

But after realizing what a powerful role coding plays in creating technologies that can transform society, she knew it was something she wanted to expose others to.

“I realized coding is amazing and thought, ‘How did I not have access to these skills sooner?'” she said.

“I wanted to offer that experience and that kind of learning to other girls who also might not have access to it,” she added, “because it’s going to continue to be relevant in the world that we live in.”

A day in the life of a Koder

The 1,000 girls that will get the opportunity to attend Karlie’s coding camps this summer will ultimately learn how to build a mobile app or website by the end of the two-week program.

Kode With Klossy currently teaches different “tracks,” including back-end and front-end development, allowing kids to learn the fundamentals of programming languages such as HTML, CSS, Ruby, and Javascript.

“This year we’ve also got a really exciting new track on Swift, so the girls at our camps not only learn the ABCs of code, but real-world examples of tech that touches our lives today,” Kloss said. “They’re learning what a loop is or how to interpolate using concepts or ideas that touch their lives, like Instagram, Twitter, or Postmates.”

Continue onto Mashable to read the complete article.

How Concierge Parenting Services Can Help Prepare Kids for College

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Group of students talking at a table filled with papers

College admissions issues has been stealing the headlines. From the college admission scandal, where wealthy people allegedly paid to help their kids get accepted to high ranking colleges, to the talk of adding diversity scores to help boost some SAT/ACT tests, the news is filled with the challenges that those wanting to go to a good college may face.

Some parents are opting to take an approach that is more tailored to helping the child become prepared to excel and get into the college of their choice. This new approach, called concierge parenting services, aims to provide a customized plan to take the child to the next level, by identifying their fullest potential and capitalizing on it.

“Too often, the approaches taken in schools are failing students. Every child learns differently, so a cookie cutter approach just doesn’t work,” explains Reena B. Patel, a parenting expert, licensed educational psychologist, and author, who offers virtual workshops. “Through concierge parenting services, parents can learn exactly what their child needs to focus on in order to excel. The plan has been tailored to their unique child.”

Recently, Gallup suggested that education in the country takes the opposite approach of standardized tests, which students are being inundated with around the nation. What they suggest is that students need a test that is for them and about them, so that they become better at understanding and developing their own unique talents, which will help them succeed in school and life. This is the goal of concierge parenting, too.

Concierge parenting is service offered by Patel and other professionals in the field, in which they conduct extensive assessment on the child. Here are some of the ways that concierge parenting services can help prepare kids for college:

  • The assessments that are conducted show a child’s strengths, so that they can capitalize on them in order to reach their goals.
  • Parents receive a customized learning profile of their child, which will give insight as to how they best learn and optimize their strengths while developing areas of need. Parents can use that information to ensure that their educational needs are being addressed and how to take their child to the next level of growth.
  • Their learning profile includes such things as the child’s emotional resilience. This is important information, because it sheds light on how well the child will adapt to stressful situations or challenges. They can use the information to help the child learn more coping skills.
  • Parents receive the tools that they need in order to help their child navigate studying, taking tests, and applying for colleges. Rather than guessing how to best go about these things, the information has been tailored to the needs and styles of the individual.
  • Similar to a concierge in a hotel, parents get a tailored approach that is focused on meeting their needs and ensuring their child’s success. By taking advantage of a service like this, parents can learn their child’s strengths then nurture them and focus on excelling those strengths to be the best version of themselves.

“If you want to feel confident about your child’s education and future college acceptance, you can’t go wrong with taking a concierge parenting approach,” added Patel. “The purpose of concierge parenting is to help remove the stress, hurdles, and disappointment that may come later on. It helps your child to set out on their path with a detailed map to help them successfully get there.”

Patel offers several concierge parenting services packages, including being able to tailor a program to meet individual needs and goals. Two of her popular packages are titled Optimal Learning and New Parent. The Optimal Learning package offers a comprehensive assessment, customized report with specific tools to apply, follow up emails to ask questions, comprehensive evaluations to include, but not limited to, intelligence testing, academic testing, social and emotional readiness, and executive functioning testing. The New Parent package focuses on the idea that every baby and child is unique and has a different temperament. It’s ideal for new parents or a parent of a teen. Finding time to address challenges, such as behaviors, or how best to get your baby to sleep is hard. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a service customized just for your family and child? One that is effective and developed by a professional expert.

Each concierge parenting package includes initial consultation to identify concerns and goals, three session observation, modeling, and implementation of expert techniques, and one follow up virtual call after strategies are implemented.

In addition to offering concierge parenting services, Patel is the founder of AutiZm& More. As a licensed educational psychologist and guidance counselor, she helps children and their families with the use of positive behavior support strategies across home, school, and community settings. She does workshops around California, and virtual workshops globally where she provides this information to health professionals, families, and educators. She is also the author of a book that helps children with anxiety coping strategies called “Winnie & Her Worries,” and author of a book about autism awareness and acceptance, called “My Friend Max: A Story about a Friend with Autism.” Both of her books are available on Amazon. To learn more about her services, visit the website at reenabpatel.com.

About Reena B. Patel
Based in the San Diego area, Reena B. Patel (LEP, BCBA) is a renowned parenting expert, guidance counselor, licensed educational psychologist, and board-certified behavior analyst. For more than 20 years, Patel has had the privilege of working with families and children, supporting all aspects of education and positive wellness. She works extensively with developing children as well as children with exceptional needs, supporting their academic, behavioral and social development.  She was recently nominated for San Diego Magazine’s “Woman of the Year.” To learn more about her books and services, visit the website at reenabpatel.com, and to get more parenting tips, follow her on Instagram @reenabpatel.

Gallup. It’s time to try the opposite of standardized testinggallup.com/education/237284

One-Year or Two-Year MBA: Is There a Simple Answer?

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group of college students walking to lecture hall

By Steve Fortin

There are now literally hundreds of MBA programs available worldwide. Evaluating an MBA today is roughly the equivalent of talking about a car—one needs more specific details to really understand how one program compares to another.

In the same way that there is often little in common between a small sports car and a large SUV, MBA programs come in many variations. Indeed, there are many comparative factors to consider, including a program’s standing in global rankings, academic design, specializations, entry requirements, delivery mode, or, most relevant to this discussion, its duration.

MBAs have become diversified products, catering to segmented clientele’s needs. Upon exploring whether a two-year MBA program is superior to a one-year program, there is, unfortunately, no simple answer to suit all circumstances.

Internships and career changes

The first argument in support of a two-year MBA program pertains to the job market. Even within a two-year program, students are under pressure, as they juggle academics with career-prep workshops. Most programs begin in August and employers arrive on campus as early as September to recruit, both for summer internships and full-time jobs. Many students say that they are unsure of the field in which they wish to specialize, yet are asked to commit to a job search within a chosen industry almost immediately.

In a two-year MBA program, this issue is actually less problematic. Students complete internships first and are then provided with additional opportunities to engage with employers the following autumn. Moreover, some students accept full-time jobs with the same employer, usually during the last two weeks of their summer internship. Most remain in the same industry, but move laterally to a different employer and/or to a different job category. Finally, some realize that the chosen industry was not for them and move to a different one altogether, typically seeking a different field of specialization in their MBA. Given the duration of the program, students will have one more round of campus recruitment and a full eight months of courses left, making such transitions possible and easy to make. We have found that students enter the next round of recruitment better prepared, more aware of their strengths and weaknesses, as well as their goals and aspirations.

A two-year MBA program allows more time to build a strong foundation

The second argument in support of a two-year MBA program relates to academics. To acquire in-depth knowledge, one needs time flexibility to build their schedule, as well as to digest and integrate content. While knowledge can often be acquired relatively quickly, developing competency requires more time. One needs to read, apply the material, build presentations, study, write exams, and experience the use of the material in real life.

One aspect that most professors will likely agree on is that the faster one is forced to learn something, the faster this material will be forgotten. A two-year MBA program allows more time to build a strong foundation, as well as to consider and select options within a given field. More time allows for more informed choices, and more informed choices translate to a more adapted education.

The third and final strength of a two-year MBA program is its resilience to errors. Students may not be aware of the different choices that exist in management education or on the management job market. If a student begins his or her studies in marketing and either struggles academically or lacks interest, there is time to reorient. As mentioned previously, if a student completes an internship and does not appreciate the practical aspects of a field, there is still time to change direction. Finally, it is also noteworthy to mention that a key advantage of an MBA is the networking opportunities that it brings. However, it can be more challenging to build lasting relationships over a more condensed period of time.

Value of one-year vs. two-year MBA may hinge on your circumstances

To summarize, the value of a two-year MBA program over a shorter one is essentially a matter of “it depends.” As a rule of thumb, the more removed an applicant is from the world of management at the time of admission, the more he or she should contemplate the two-year degree. The strength of a two-year program is the additional time that it affords to build expertise, explore the job market, and validate both academic and career choices. In my opinion, ideal candidates for such a program would be international students, as well as those seeking a career change, such as engineers, lawyers, teachers, artists and others who are interested in a management career and/or in relocating to a different country.

However, the closer one is to the world of management, the stronger the argument in favor of a one-year MBA. Those looking to move up in their career are the target clientele. Career climbers are less likely to feel the need to acquire knowledge of the job market, or to build strong foundations in management. Thus, students who meet this profile will likely be well-served by a one-year degree. This is why, after all, MBA programs of varying durations exist in the first place, as they are built to adapt to different clienteles and their respective needs.

Nevertheless, as the saying goes, the proof is often in the pudding. Indeed, this is probably the strongest argument of all: When given a choice to go faster, our well-informed students choose to take more time!

Demand for MPS Degrees on the Rise

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Students going over paperwork seated outside

By Lawrence Hardy, Georgetown University

The past 20 years have seen tremendous growth in the number of master’s degrees awarded—and this trend shows no signs of stopping.

Indeed, according to the report Understanding the Changing Market for Professional Master’s Programs by the Education Advisory Board (EAB)—which does market research for colleges and universities—within the next seven years master’s degrees will account for nearly a third of all postsecondary degrees.

But there’s a twist: This increase won’t be coming from “traditional” master’s programs. “The new growth will come primarily from professional master’s programs focused on specific job skills that help students gain a new job or advance in an existing position,” the EAB report said, referring to degrees like the Master of Professional Studies (MPS).

The importance of any college degree to future job earnings cannot be overstated. A report from Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce titled, “Good Jobs are Back: College Graduates are First in Line,” said that 2.9 million “good jobs” (those that paid upwards of $53,000) have been created since 2010 and that 2.8 million of these positions went to college graduates. But the higher education advantage doesn’t stop with a bachelor’s degree.

“We’re creating a lot of bachelor-degree jobs, but people with graduate degrees are the ones who have really seen their earnings go up,” said Andrew Hanson, a Senior Analyst for the Center.

 

A Different Kind of Master’s Degree

To help meet the increased demand, Georgetown’s School of Continuing Studies (SCS) offers a broad range of MPS degrees and Executive MPS degrees and plans to add more based on the evolving needs of working professionals and employers.

SCS currently offers MPS degrees in areas including Emergency & Disaster Management, Global Strategic Communications, and Hospitality Management. To see other programs offered, visit scs.georgetown.edu.

Though all master’s degrees help increase a person’s ability to advance within his or her career, “what really sets job seekers apart is having in-depth knowledge that no other candidates have, and that comes from the type of skills conferred in a very specialized master’s program,” said Lisa Geraci, a Senior Consultant for EAB. “It’s no longer enough to be just a generalist.”

 

Four Kinds of “Working Professionals”

How does an MPS degree differ from a “traditional” master’s degree? The answer speaks to both the types of students who enroll and the type of education they are receiving.

First, the students: They are usually “nontraditional,” meaning not right out of college. They are, on average, a few years older. And perhaps, most significantly, they are usually employed. But the term “working professionals,” while accurate, isn’t precise enough to describe their specific needs. Thus, EAB divides them into four groups:

  • Career Starters—Recent graduates seeking a professional degree before entering the workforce. (These, of course, do not fit the “nontraditional” or “working professional” designations.)
  • Career Changers—Mid-career adults seeking graduate degrees to move into new fields.
  • Career Advancers—Mid-career professionals seeking graduate degrees to earn a promotion or a raise.
  • Career Crossers—Mid-career professionals seeking cross-training to advance in current fields.

Most fundamentally, MPS degrees teach students very specific knowledge with the goal of helping them in their current careers or in a career they are aiming to pursue. Theoretical knowledge taught by more traditional master’s programs may be useful, but most students need practical, applicable skills that they can use in their current workplaces.

 

MPS Programs Are Tailored to Student Needs

One of the biggest advantages of professional programs like the MPS, students said, is the opportunity to connect with students and faculty who work in the field. There are ample opportunities for networking, internships, and other career advancement benefits. Not only does this make for fascinating class discussions, but it also provides students with established industry contacts—an advantage when they look to advance in their careers.

For those seeking to enter an MPS program, academic prerequisites are just as important as workplace skills, life experience, and, of course, the potential to use the MPS to advance the candidate’s career and the needs of society.

Because most students are working and their time is limited, they need a master’s program that has an accelerated format and flexible class times that can work around their schedules. A well-designed professional degree program “breaks through the constraints of geography, schedule, age, and academic preparation that have historically and artificially limited the master’s degree marketplace,” the EAB report said. “Freed of these constraints, professional master’s programs appeal to the needs of a much larger population.”

About the Author

Lawrence Hardy serves as a writer and editor for the Marketing department at Georgetown University’s School of Continuing Studies.

 

Source: scs.georgetown.edu

Mathematics’ Highest Prize Awarded to UT Austin’s Karen Uhlenbeck

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Karen Uhlenbeck stands in front of chalkboard filled with mathe equatons with her arms folded wearing a green sweater

Austin, TX–A professor emerita of mathematics at The University of Texas at Austin has received mathematics’ top international award for the year. The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters has named Karen Uhlenbeck its 2019 Abel Prize award winner.

The prestigious international award, modeled after the Nobel Prize, comes with a monetary award of 6 million Norwegian kroner, approximately $700,000.

“For more than three decades at The University of Texas, Karen Uhlenbeck conducted research that revolutionized geometric analysis and mathematics as a whole” said President Gregory L. Fenves. “She was an inspiring teacher and dedicated mentor to thousands of UT students, motivating them to reach great heights in their academic and professional lives. The Abel Prize is the highest honor in mathematics, and it is one that Professor Uhlenbeck richly deserves.”

Uhlenbeck was cited “for her pioneering achievements in geometric partial differential equations, gauge theory and integrable systems, and for the fundamental impact of her work on analysis, geometry and mathematical physics.” Her work has been described as some of the most important in 20th century mathematics, constituting revolutionary advances in geometry.

The President of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, Hans Petter Graver, announced the winner of the Abel Prize at the academy in Oslo today. Norway’s King Harald V will present the Abel Prize to Uhlenbeck at an award ceremony in Oslo on May 21.

Some of her most noted work focused on gauge theories, providing an analytical foundation for a number of concepts explored in modern physics.

“Uhlenbeck’s research has led to revolutionary advances at the intersection of mathematics and physics,” said Paul Goldbart, dean of the College of Natural Sciences and a professor of physics. “Her pioneering insights have applications across a range of fascinating subjects, from string theory, which may help explain the nature of reality, to the geometry of space-time.”

Continue on to the University of Texas at Austin to read the complete article.

Celebrating International Women’s Day

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Every year on March 8th, women around the world come together to celebrate women’s social, economic, cultural and political achievements. International Women’s Day is an opportunity to stand in solidarity with all those fearless women standing up for gender equality and spotlight those who often pass unnoticed.

This year’s campaign theme—#BalanceforBetter—represents how, from grassroots activism to worldwide action, we are entering an exciting period of history where the world expects balance. Balance drives a better working world, and the better the balance, the better the world. “We notice its absence and celebrate its presence. Let’s all help create a #BalanceforBetter.”

The 2019 #BalanceforBetter campaign does not start or end on International Women’s Day—it runs all year long. Its theme provides a unified direction to guide and galvanize continuous collective action, with #BalanceforBetter activity reinforced and amplified all year.

Source: internationalwomensday.com

Ethiopia’s First Woman President

SOTERAS/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Sahle-Work Zewde’s election as president of Ethiopia is a landmark in many respects. It is the first time in Ethiopia’s history that a woman is assuming this elected high office, a new milestone in Ethiopia’s trajectory towards women’s empowerment and effective participation in political decision-making. She is also Africa’s only serving head of state.

Source: au.int

Brazil’s New Agriculture Minister
Tereza Cristina: Tereza Cristina, Brazil’s agriculture minister SERGIO LIMA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Tereza Cristina, head of Brazil’s farmer’s caucus in the lower house, was named by President Jair Bolsonaro as agriculture minister. She is the first female cabinet member the president-elect has appointed and the second to hold the position, after Kátia Abreu.

Source: Bloomberg.com

First Female Mayor of Tunisia

After 160 years, and 32 mayors, the North African capital of Tunisia has elected its first-ever female mayor. Souad Abderrahim a self-made businesswoman said in an interview after being elected, “I am only one among many women who have struggled for years for equality.”

Source: washingtonpost.com

Haifa’s First Woman Mayor
Einat: Einat Kalisch-Rotem, mayor of Haifa, Israel EDWARD KAPROV
This past fall Einat Kalisch-Rotem made history as the first woman to become mayor in Haifa, one of Israel’s three largest cities. Kalisch-Rotem ran on an independent list with the “Living in Haifa” faction against the incumbent mayor, Yona Yahav, whom she defeated with 55 percent of the vote.

Source: jta.org

Japan’s First Female Fighter Pilot
Misa Matsushima: First Lieutenant Misa Matsushima of the Japan Air Self Defence Force poses in the cockpit of an F-15J air superiority fighter at Nyutabaru airbase in the outskirts of Miyazaki, Miyazaki in Japan JIJI PRESS/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
1st Lt. Misa Matsuhima made history this past summer when she became the first woman to qualify as a fighter jet pilot in Japan’s Air Self-Defense Force (ASDF). “My longtime dream has come true. I want to become a fully-fledged pilot, no different from men, as soon as possible,” she said after a ceremony at an ASDF base.

Source: japantimes.co.jp

Women Joining Front Lines in the British Army
Kat Dixon: Royal Wessex Yeomanry Tank Gunner reservist Lance Corporal Kat Dixon, 28, from Swindon in Southwest England BEN BIRCHALL/PA IMAGES VIA GETTY IMAGES
Defense Secretary Gavin Williamson announced that all roles in the military are now open to women. Lance Corporal Kat Dixon from Swindon, is one of the first to serve in a frontline role as a tank gunner in the British Army.

Source: swindonadvertiser.co.uk

First Woman Wins Clipper Round-the-World Yacht Race
Wendy Tuck: Wendy Tuck became the first female skipper to win the Clipper Round-the-World Yacht Race in 2018. MIGUEL ROJO/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Wendy Tuck from Australia made history this past summer when she became the first female skipper to win the Clipper Round-the-World Yacht Race. Tuck told the Australian Daily Telegraph, “I hate banging on about women. I just do what I do but I am very proud.”

Source: bbc.com

Long Beach Teacher Changes Lives in New Documentary “Freedom Writers: Stories from the Heart” Airs Mar. 28 on PBS SoCal

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PBS SoCal recently announced the premiere of “Freedom Writers: Stories from the Heart​,” a documentary that follows a Southern Calif. teacher’s journey to change the lives of her students, transforming their literacy skills through hands-on, active learning.

The film will air on Thurs., Mar. 28 at 8 p.m. on PBS SoCal and be available for streaming following the broadcast at pbssocal.org/freedomwriters.

Directed and executive produced by Don Hahn (The Gamble House, Maleficent, The Lion King) and produced by Lori Korngiebel (The Finest Hours, John Carter), “Freedom Writers: Stories from the Heart​” follows idealistic teacher Erin Gruwell as she tries to reach 150 at-risk students who were labeled “unteachable.” It’s 1994 and Long Beach, Calif. is a racially divided community filled with drugs, gang warfare and homicides. Inside the classroom, Gruwell encounters hostility, indifference and racial divisions between students. The struggle and strife on the streets has carried into the school halls.

Refusing to give up, Gruwell uses relevant literature and media to compare current reality in urban America to the worst examples throughout history of man’s inhumanity to one another. Her students are particularly inspired by the writings of Anne Frank and Zlata Filipovic. They ultimately choose to put down their weapons and pick up a pen. The once-hardened teens discover a new way to express themselves in order to embrace history, humanity and hope. By sharing their stories, they rewrite their futures and become catalysts for change.

Several community screenings of the film will be held at various colleges throughout Southern Calif. as listed below (*subject to change).  For more information about the film and attending the screenings, please go to pbssocal.org/freedomwriters.

  • Thurs., Feb. 28 at Chapman University at 7 pm
  • Tues., Mar. 6 at University of California Riverside at 7 pm
  • Wed., Mar. 13 at Cal State University Channel Islands at 5 pm
  • Thurs., Mar. 14 at University of California Irvine at 7 pm
  • Sun., Mar. 17 at the Museum of Tolerance at 6 pm
  • Tues., Mar. 19 at Cal State University San Bernadino at 6 pm
  • Wed., Mar. 20 at Cal State University Long Beach at 6 pm

Join the conversation on social media using @PBSSoCal and #FreedomWritersPBS

ABOUT PBS SOCAL

PBS SoCal delivers content and experiences that inspire, inform and entertain – over the air, online, in the community and in the classroom. We offer the full slate of beloved PBS programs including MASTERPIECE, NOVA, PBS NewsHour, Frontline, Independent Lens, a broad library of documentary films including works from Ken Burns; and educational PBS KIDS programs including Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood and Curious George. Our programs are accessible for free through four broadcast channels, and available for streaming at pbssocal.org, on the PBS mobile apps, and via connected TV services Android TV, Roku, Apple TV and Amazon Fire TV. PBS SoCal is a donor-supported community institution that is a part of Public Media Group of Southern California, the flagship PBS station for 19 million diverse people across California.

Women Aren’t Running Self-Driving Car Startups; Zoox Is About To Change That

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Robo-taxi developer Zoox isn’t the biggest or best-funded player in the self-driving vehicle space and hasn’t logged the most test miles. But when a new CEO joins the Silicon Valley startup next month, it will leapfrog competitors in one important way: It will be the only autonomous vehicle tech firm led by a woman.

The Foster City, California-based company announced last week that Aicha Evans, formerly Intel’s chief strategy officer, will become its CEO on February 26. Her background as a naturalized U.S. citizen born in Senegal distinguishes her as one of the few African-Americans running a tech startup. She will also be the only woman CEO among three dozen self-driving car companies, based on a review by Forbes.

“It’s welcome news in a male-dominated field,” said Bryan Reimer, a research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s AgeLab. “The computer science community to start with is heavily male-dominated, the auto industry is heavily male-dominated. It’s critical that if (autonomous vehicles are) to be a sustaining evolution of technology there’s going to have to be diversification in the leadership as well.”

Women and people of color remain underrepresented as leaders in the auto and tech industries. Looking back to the fabled U.S. government-sponsored DARPA Challenge races of 2005 and 2007 that ignited the robot car revolutions, rosters for the era’s two dominant teams, Carnegie Mellon University and Stanford University, include only one or two women each among dozens of brainy young engineers and computer scientists. Improving gender and ethnic diversity at tech and auto companies isn’t a superficial step – multiple studies find that it meaningfully boosts corporate performance and creates better companies.

“When organizations are represented by people who have similar backgrounds, experiences, education, it can lead to group think – so you’re not getting the most creative ideas,” said Ashley Martin, assistant professor of organizational behavior at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business. “Also having social category diversity (e.g., gender, race), can lead to more information elaboration/consideration of ideas and therefore people thinking more carefully and creatively about their decisions, with the potential to lead to better performance.”

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

Students In The Workplace Keep Industry And Academia On The Cutting Edge

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group of college students walking to lecture hall

When college students can spend several months at top international firms like Goldman Sachs, they naturally come away with valuable résumé-building experience. But what’s often left out of the conversation is the value that students inject back into the business.

Joseph Camarda, a managing director in private wealth management at Goldman Sachs in San Francisco, cited this mutually beneficial exchange when explaining why the company has partnered with Drexel University in Philadelphia to place 145 students in cooperative education positions at its U.S. offices since 2014.

“They bring a young, vibrant, innovative mind to the team and that adds a value that we want to use over and over,” he said.

By collaborating with businesses, colleges and universities can deliver on the promise of relevance for career-minded students. From co-ops and internships, to mentoring and research opportunities, they can also invigorate programs on campus and bring value to firms.

Ashley Inman, a human resources expert who has worked with college interns in several industries, recalled one intern at a construction firm who developed an app for the company to better track inventory — a strategic innovation that helped streamline sales.

“Organizations can get stuck in their ways,” she said. “The value that the students bring is a fresh perspective.”

It’s part of the reason Goldman values its partnership with the university today — 13 years after the co-op relationship began with just a few students in the company’s Philadelphia office. A number of graduates since that time have gone on to work for Goldman full-time.

“The work ethic of these students is just phenomenal,” Camarda said. “It shows up every day.”

Real-Life Reciprocity

Students, in turn, bring valuable perspectives back to campus with them – including “bottom-line” urgency that can sometimes be lacking in academia, said Inman, who sits on the talent acquisition panel of the Society for Human Resource Management.

Strong and meaningful links to industry can inform curricula and programming on campus – helping to make sure academic offerings remain relevant to the needs of industry and students seeking jobs.

Higher education, however, has typically struggled to create and maintain those links, leading to a skills gap that leaves companies with jobs they can’t fill and students who can’t get jobs.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

One female engineer shatters space’s glass ceiling

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How one woman overcame adversity and found success in space.

Diana Trujillo has always looked to the stars.

Growing up in Colombia during the 1980s, a place and time known for its civil unrest, she would stargaze to escape from the danger in her country. “I knew there had to be something better than this,” she recalls, adding, “Somewhere better than where I was.”

It’s that yearning which pushed Trujillo to immigrate to the United States with only $300 in her pocket, receive a degree in aerospace mechanics and biomechanics, and become one of the first Hispanic women to break into the aerospace industry.

Today, Trujillo oversees dozens of engineers and spearheads crucial projects, including a rover mission to Mars to explore the Gale Crater with one of the most technologically advanced rovers ever built.

We recently sat down with Trujillo to discuss resilience, the future of STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics), and her advice for thriving in a male-dominated industry. Here’s an excerpt of the conversation, edited and condensed for clarity:

Q:| You went from being a Hispanic immigrant who didn’t speak English to one of the country’s top female engineers. How did you turn what many would consider an adversity into an asset for your career?

It was an asset the whole time—I needed to decide how I would see it. My upbringing has taught me that you never give up. I’m not shy of asking what I want to do. I don’t run away from the problem; I run toward the problem. It’s something my peers find very valuable, because they know I’m going to grab any problem by the horns.

Q:| What’s been the biggest challenge in your career so far and what did you do to overcome it?

Honestly, the biggest challenge has been to get over myself. I often text my husband saying, “Oh, man, I’m in a meeting with 17 people and I’m the only girl.” So what if I’m the only girl? It doesn’t make me less capable. I’m all about having more women in the workforce, and having more women of color in the workforce. So, when there aren’t any other women in the room, I need to do my best and let other women in. If I’m too preoccupied about being the only one, I won’t perform.

Q:| What advice do you have for women to get over themselves, own a room, and own their place at the table?

It’s not about you; it’s about the goal. You need to focus on the goal. Nobody’s going to argue with you if your discussion is all about the goal. When the goal is bigger than you, it’s doesn’t matter who sets it because it’s for the greater good of the team.

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Is college the only path? Picking the education that’s best for you

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Is college the best choice for you?

For generations, high school students like you have been told that a college degree is the route to success and financial security.But it’s not the only way to go: in fact, while it may seem like all your friends are heading off to college, a large number of high school graduates—about 30 percent—don’t take the college path.

Finding happiness and success in your career should start with evaluating your goals, personality and interests because—luckily—you have options.

With costs rising, college can be a huge investment, and like any good investment you need to understand the risk, costs and potential value you can gain. Explore these higher education paths—and some tips for calculating the return on investment (ROI) of your education:

Depending on your course of study, a vocational training program can pay for itself within eight months of graduation—far quicker than a four-year degree. Lynnette Khalfani-Cox

A four-year college:

A four-year college degree is the most common—and one of the most lucrative—routes to take after high school. But even with a four-year degree, much of your ROI depends on what you choose to study: before picking a major, think about how much money you’ll need to fork over and the salary you can expect after you graduate.

Many online tools or apps, like the JA Build Your Future app from Junior Achievement USA, or College Scorecard from the US Department of Education, can give you a good idea of the ROI on your college degree. They factor in average debt, starting salary information, and more, and work with community colleges, as well as four-year colleges and universities.

  • Tuition: According to the College Board, the total in-state cost of attendance at a public four-year college averages $25,290 per year. At a private, nonprofit university, the cost is almost double that—$50,900 annually. That means the overall price tag is roughly $100,000-$200,000. Not surprisingly, 65 percent of college grads earning four-year degrees in 2017 ended up with student loans; their average amount of college debt topped $29,650.
  • Salary: The upside of paying higher tuition at a four-year school is that you’ll likely end up making more money. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the median earnings for college grads with a four-year college degree is $61,724 annually. And salaries can go even higher, depending on the career you choose. People with advanced degrees typically earn bigger salaries—$1,512 weekly, or $78,624 yearly. Then again, advanced degrees also translate into extra tuition—another cost that you’ll need to factor into your ROI calculation. To avoid that extra cost, consider a bachelor’s degree with high earning potential for recent graduates like chemical or electrical engineering, which report salaries in the $70,000 – $75,000 range for recent grads.

Community college:

The National Center on Education Statistics shows that almost twice as many people attend two-year community colleges as those who attend four-year colleges and universities. At a community college, you can earn an associate’s degree after taking coursework in a general major—like business, biology, or communications—or in a specific vocational field, like nursing, criminal justice, or early childhood education. This coursework can prepare you for a bunch of careers, including medical assistant, police officer, oil and gas operator, or software or website developer.

  • Tuition: Community colleges are usually a lot less expensive than four-year schools: according to the College Board the total cost of attendance at a public, two-year community college averages $17,580 per year for in-district commuter students. That includes tuition, fees, room and board, books, supplies, and transportation costs. Overall, that works out to $35,160 for a two-year associate’s degree. That’s about $66,000 less than what you would spend on in-state tuition and fees at a four-year public college.
  • Salary: The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that people with a two-year degree earn a median salary of $825 a week or $42,900 annually. And while this salary might limit your ability to live in some quickly growing cities, there are a number of cities where you can live comfortably on less than 50,000 per year.
  • For some jobs requiring a two-year degree, the payoff is even higher. Air traffic controllers make a median income of $122,410, while dental hygienists average $72,910 and paralegals make $49,500.

Vocational training:

Vocational training, sometimes called technical training programs or trade schools, might be a good option if you prefer working with your hands, want to avoid a desk job, and only want to take training and instruction that is directly related to your future career. These programs commonly lead students into careers in hands-on trades like construction, metal work, masonry, and photography.

  • Tuition: The average cost for a vocational training program is $33,000 over a two year period, but many students can complete their vocational schooling in less than two years—especially those that enroll full-time in a trade school.
  • Salary: Salaries for hands-on trades vary widely, but jobs like installation, maintenance, and repair have median earnings of $950 a week, or $49,400 annually. With that kind of salary, your vocational training will pay for itself in just 8 months after your work start date.

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