“America’s Top 50 Organizations for Multicultural Business Opportunities” Announced

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Today, OMNIKAL announced “America’s Top 50 Organizations for Multicultural Business Opportunities”,  known as the “Omni50.”

The Omni50 represent the top 50 U.S. organizations who are awarding the most business to the growing culturally diverse marketplace. These same organizations are also successfully appealing to the growing millennial generation, which, by 2020, will be the largest diverse market segment in America (a market segment that is forcing brands to evolve from minority/diversity paradigms to inclusion).

Apple Inc. was named the #1 Organization for Multicultural Business Opportunities in the United States. Other companies at the top of the winners list include: Walmart Inc., Northrop Grumman Corporation,AT&T Inc., IBM, The Coca-Cola Company, Bank of America, Raytheon Company, Verizon, General Motors Company, Time Warner Inc., PepsiCo Inc., United Parcel Service, Cisco Systems, Inc., Colgate-Palmolive Company, Altria Group and The Kroger Company.

Who are the Omni50?

The Omni50 represents the voice of OMNIKAL’s 2,100,000 members. The list is circulated by over 1000 organizations, which reaches millions of consumers every year. Since 1999, it has become a highly valued metric of excellence in reaching the diverse and inclusive majority marketplace.

The Omni50 Awards is the most recognized honor for diversity and inclusion in the country.  These award-winning companies truly differentiate themselves in the marketplace in a time when inclusion has become one of the most important goals of every organization. It is also at a time when public recognition is key to ongoing financial, ethical, social and cultural success.

“The inclusion practices of the “Omni50” Awardees have changed the course of our current economy and as a result, the world as we know it” said Kenton Clarke, CEO of OMNIKAL. “The changing multicultural and multi-generational landscape of our country has demanded this evolution. OMNIKAL is proud to have been a force in the business world for such positive change. Our mission and goal is to equalize, broaden and level the playing field for both brands and an increasingly varied vendor/supplier marketplace.”

Top Honors for Top Organizations Who Do the Right Thing

Most “top” lists honor companies for traditional economic growth, shareholder returns and similar metrics; however, the Omni50 awards are an indicator of which organizations provide the best business opportunities to the increasingly inclusive majority marketplace. This, in turn, influences more organizations, as they compete for market share in multicultural and multigenerational communities.

The Business Power of Inclusion

As the culturally diverse market gains more buying power, corporations have to focus their efforts on rebranding and reorganizing to avoid losing market share and to remain current and relevant.

The Omni50 list has therefore become the most critical guide for businesses as well as consumers. “As a business owner, I appreciate the business we receive from corporate buyers; and in turn, when I buy either personally or for my company, I am more likely to buy from the same companies that support my business or are supporting businesses like mine,” said Kathy Steele, principle of Red Caffeine headquartered in Elmhurst, Illinois.

About OMNIKAL

OMNIKAL was founded in 1999. Now the Nation’s largest inclusive business organization, OMNIKAL promotes entrepreneurship and the belief that entrepreneurs create real world solutions to today’s business and economic challenges. By fostering deeper and broader collaboration between business owners and entrepreneurial support organizations, the OMNIKAL network fuels healthier ecosystems through job creation, professional development and drives innovation resulting in strong economic growth.

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Click here to see the full list of companies

A Latina Google Strategist’s Views On Authenticity, Embracing Your Identity And The Power Of Instagram

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Dannie Fountain is known as a builder, whether she’s rebuilding her own identity or building a brand, she has a reputation for how tightly she can weave a story that just feels right.

While the skill set was there during her teenage years it was her freshman year of college that challenged her ability to put them to the test.

“I was adopted at 16, changing my identity all over again, and removing my ability to access the historical information that had been shared, because I no longer had access to their source – my mother’s anecdotal nuggets,” explains Fountain. “My identity changed once again during my freshman year of college. Through some health-related decisions, tough conversations, and a DNA test, I discovered that the wholly-British descent I’d been raised to understand was actually pretty off.”

The unexpected medical tests led to Fountain discovering that she was Latinx and deciding to melt into an identity that had always belonged to her.

Now as a strategist at Google and as an independent marketing consultant, Fountain uses her storytelling skills to support brands and their larger missions.

Below she shares how she champions inclusivity in all the spaces she inhabits, what advice she has for other Latinxs, and how she balances both her corporate job and side hustles.

Vivian Nunez: What made you join the team at Google in addition to working for yourself? 

Dannie Fountain: Truthfully, I wasn’t looking for a job when the Google opportunity happened. I was surviving (nay, thriving) in the rollercoaster of “feast and famine” that is entrepreneurship and I truly was in love with my life. When the Google opportunity first cropped up in my inbox, my reaction was one of imposter syndrome – who am I to believe I’m important/talented/brave/strong/cool enough to pursue an opportunity like this? But Google has this kind of kinetic power, one that won’t let you say no. So I pursued it, and the more I pursued it, the more I fell in love. Now, nine months later, I can truly smile when I say Google is my corporate home and the first place I’ve ever worked where I’ve unapologetically brought my whole self to work every single day. 

Nunez: How have you navigated the transition to an in-house, full-time job? 

Fountain: I’ve always been a “side hustler” in some form of the word – whether it was running my marketing consulting firm while in college or running my second business while maintaining my first. But this transition from freelancing to working at Google was an interesting one. Before I came to Google, I was on the road nearly 24/7 for speaking engagements and work. Not only was I coming back into a space where I had a boss again, but I also was going to have an apartment of my own for the first time in nearly 2 years.

The transition was smoother than expected in some ways (i.e. I have fallen in love with having a commute again) and harder in others (I didn’t actually stop traveling as much and so I still feel like I’m on the road all the time). Having coworkers and the resources to do all the things I’ve dreamed of doing is incredible – I love the opportunity for casual collision that sparks these moments of innovation that profoundly change the way I think about marketing. I’m beyond grateful for the access and opportunity I’ve gotten in the nine months I’ve been at Google. But at the end of the day, I’m a Googler and still a freelancer, so really not much has changed.

Nunez: How important is it for you that others understand that you are proudly Latina?

Fountain: In some ways, I feel so much shame for identifying as Latina. My grasp on culture and history is limited. My grasp on language is weak. My appearance is that of a white woman. It took me taking an actual DNA test and seeing the results with my own eyes before I’d actually start checking the “hispanic or latino” box on things, let alone verbally speaking that identity aloud.

But I also recognize my privilege. I know that I have the power to walk into a room and be presumed white and there is so much responsibility in that presumption. There’s this profound sense of urgency to make it unequivocally clear that [Latinx] is who I am, all in, 100%

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

How A Love For Math Turned Into A Career In Venture Capital

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When Anarghya Vardhana, a principal at Maveron, was growing up, the most common language spoken in her house was math. Her father was an engineer and her grandfather, a math professor. That formed her dream of solving the Riemann hypothesis, the theory that prime numbers follow a pattern and led her to study math at Stanford University.  She envisioned working in number theory and teaching at the university level. Then everything changed.

“I realized that I wanted to make an impact,” said Vardhana. “Maybe I could solve this amazing math problem; but even if I did, I would not really see the impact of it on people during my lifetime.”

The iPhone had launched and Vardhana got excited at the idea of combining technology, science and math with business to create something that immediately got into the hands of people and changed how they lived.

“I could still love science, math and technology, but do it in a different way,” explained Vardhana. “

That skill set took her from a first job at Google to an early stage startup in product management. She had some exposure to venture capitalists (VCs) but never thought it was a job for young people or someone who hadn’t sold a company. As she struggled with how to align her passions and professional interests, her sister urged her to become a VC.

Then only in high school, her sister outlined four points why:

1) Relationships are important to you and early stage venture is relationship driven.

2) You love researching and developing a point of view. VCs think around the corners to develop a thesis around where the world is headed.

3) You know technical process.

4) You are the only woman on your product team. Less than 2% of venture dollars go to women. You could be part of making sure capital flows in a way that’s equitable to women and people of color.

Vardhana also saw that venture would allow her to mentor. As a VC you have a dynamic relationship with your founders, where at times, you are also a coach and teacher.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

Mellody Hobson Will Become Starbucks Vice Chair After Howard Schultz Departure

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Mellody Hobson, president of Chicago-based investment firm Ariel Investments, will be moving into a role as Starbucks’s vice chair following Executive Chairman Howard Schultz‘s departure on June 26.

A Chicago native, Hobson worked her way up after joining Ariel as a college intern in the 1990s, going on to become the company’s vice president of marketing, then a senior vice president, and eventually president at the firm. Ariel’s holdings include MSG Networks, Northern Institutional Treasury Portfolio, First American Financial Corp., and Kennametal, among others.

A member of Starbucks’ board of directors since 2005, Hobson has also served on the boards of Estée Lauder, DreamWorks Animation, and Groupon.

Throughout her career, Hobson has made financial literacy and community outreach a priority. Currently, she serves as chair on the board of directors of The Economic Club of Chicago, as well as chair of After School Matters, a Chicago nonprofit that provides teens with out-of-school time programs.

Continue onto Fortune to read the complete article.

This Latina VP Believes This One Trick Will Help Build A Diverse Pipeline

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Carly Sanchez has led with a people first mindset since the beginning of her career in higher education, now as the Executive Vice President and Head of Talent Acquisition Strategy and Delivery at Wells Fargo she is able to scale her impact.

“[My role] encompasses the leadership of all team member hiring globally for positions across Wells Fargo at all levels, with an emphasis on targeted recruiting for diverse segments,” explains Sanchez. “I serve as the primary liaison to the Chief Diversity Officer for all human capital diversity issues.”

As a Latina, Sanchez understands the impact of having the right structures in place that would help facilitate not only the hiring of a diverse talent pool, but also its retention.

“I think it is critical for Latinas to serve as sponsors and actively engage in identifying and sponsoring talent for positions to advance careers of those coming through the ranks,” shares Sanchez.

The goal is to ensure that those who are talented and qualified have the opportunity to walk through the right doors and feel like they belong.

“I gain the greatest satisfaction from helping identify diverse talent and enabling their future path through education as an admissions officer and now through facilitating opportunities for career advancement through recruiting, hiring and D&I work,” says Sanchez.

Below Sanchez shares more about her day-to-day work, what her hopes are for Latina peer mentorship, and her advice to all who are navigating corporate ladders.

Vivian Nunez: How would you define your career’s mission and how do you implement it on a day to day? 

Carly Sanchez: My career mission is to optimize opportunities for talented individuals that will allow and enable them to maximize that talent in an environment that is conducive and values a diversity of perspectives and backgrounds. On a day to day level, my role now is less focused on individual positions for which we are hiring (although I still do stay involved in that) and now more focused on designing a strategy and organizational structure that will enable the businesses and functions at Wells Fargo to attract and promote the best most diverse mix of talent to support the work.

Nunez: How do you ensure that hiring is as diverse as possible? 

Sanchez: Outreach and sourcing of diverse talent pools is critical, building the pipelines in advance of the opening of a position. This enables us to build diverse candidate slates for review and increases opportunities for selection in an equitable process. Our team partners with many diversity focused organizations to build talent pools, targets potential sources of talent (for example, working with military bases for hiring of transitioning military etc.), partners with HR partners and hiring managers to identify where we may have greater opportunity to increase diversity at all levels of the organization, and consults on issues related to D&I including how Unconscious Bias can negatively impact our commitment to a diverse and inclusive workforce.

Nunez: What advice do you have for Latinas who are looking to break into spaces that are predominantly white? 

Sanchez: Mentoring and sponsorship can be critical as Latinas look to bring their talent to different challenging environments.  Identifying individuals who can help you learn more about the role and meet individuals working in these organizations is ideal. It is also important to research and educate oneself about the organization, including developing a detailed understanding of the mission, the day to day work and any available information on the organization. This demonstrates your true interest and commitment when you have an opportunity to connect.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

Debra Perelman Named Revlon’s First Female CEO in Its 86-Year History

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It took 86 years, but Revlon has finally appointed a female CEO for the first time in its history. Just four months after being named Revlon’s COO, Debra Perelman will take over from interim CEO Paul Meister as the company’s new CEO, WWD reports.

Perelman, who is the daughter of billionaire financier and Revlon board chairman Ronald Perelman (who bought the company in 1985) has worked in the family business for 20 years. Her initiatives at Revlon, according to WWD, include shepherding the brand into the Internet age with a focus on e-commerce and now, instilling a “culture of innovation” at the company.

“We have some iconic brands in our portfolio and the categories they’re in today are categories that are growing — growing in the U.S. and growing in many markets around the world,” Debra Perelman told WWD. “It’s a good position for us to be in to really drive the business to capture leadership positions where we should be winning.”

As anyone who saw the Broadway musical War Paint knows, Revlon was founded in 1932 by brothers Charles and Joseph Revson and chemist Charles Lachman. Since then, it has acquired brands such as Elizabeth Arden and Almay and introduced fragrances like Charlie and Jean Naté. The company has recently been through a revolving door of CEOs of late, and as WWD notes, the hope is for Perelman to bring stability and innovation to the position.

Continue onto Allure to read the complete article.

 

NYSE will be run by a woman for the first time in 226-year history

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The New York Stock Exchange is about to be run by a woman for the first time in its 226-year history.

The exchange announced that Stacey Cunningham will become the exchange’s 67th president as of Friday. Cunningham, who is currently NYSE’s chief operating officer, started as a floor clerk at the exchange in 1996.

In 2002, Catherine Kinney became the NYSE’s first woman co-president. But that was at a time when the exchange’s CEO or chairman was the ultimate boss. Now that responsibility falls on the president.

When Cunningham started at the exchange it was overwhelmingly male, and it is still dominated by men. Of the 21 executives of Intercontinental Exchange Group (ICE), NYSE’s corporate parent, only four including Cunningham are women.

Her appointment comes as as Wall Street and the NYSE are facing increased pressure to be more inclusive of women. It recently agreed to have the “Fearless Girl” statue moved to a spot in front of the exchange.

The biggest challenge faced by Cunningham is diminished significance of major exchanges in an era of electronic trading.

At the time Cunningham first joined the exchange 22 years ago, the NYSE and rival NASDAQ still controlled the overwhelming majority of equities traded in the United States. Today both exchanges handle far fewer trades than those completed electronically.

Continue onto CNN to read the complete article.

The Growing Influence of Women Entrepreneurs

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Business people meeting in conference room

There are many challenges that women face in the modern workplace — and that goes double for the boardroom or when trying to break through the ever-present ‘glass ceiling.’ These issues are never more of a challenge than when a woman decides she is going to go ‘off on her own’ as an entrepreneur. With locating reasonable financing, confronting gender bias and the paucity of appropriate mentors and the diminutive learning curve, a business owned and run by a woman can be a real struggle for survival.

Because of these special challenges, some backward-looking people still insist that women aren’t cut out to become business owners in their own right. This kind of negative mindset increases, sadly, when the woman is a person of color or disabled — or in any other way marginalized by lingering male prejudices. To break down these persistent barriers to success, women must be willing to understand and recognize the problems they face when beginning a woman-centric enterprise. With understanding comes the determination to not let such medieval concepts upset their plans and helps to bring more women into entrepreneurial endeavors.

Finding the money

Traditional lenders, such as banks and credit unions, are some of the worst offenders when it comes to gender prejudice. Studies show that such lending institutions continue to be resistant to loaning out seed money to women entrepreneurs, to the extent that their approval rating is as much as 20 percent less than it is for men who are starting their own companies. While women do have a healthy access to alternative lenders offering business loans, which somewhat levels the playing field, these other lenders, usually online, charge interest rates that are always higher than a regular bank. So this means a woman-owned business starts off with a heavier debt load.

One alternative that seems to be working in women’s favor, though, is the rise in crowdfunding initiatives. This is a completely gender-neutral venue for raising capital for new businesses.

Mentoring

The process of mentoring is a recognized necessity for most male entrepreneurs, and there are many channels through which a man can obtain another older and experienced man’s help in starting up a new business. The same cannot be said for women — yet. Luckily, the numbers are going in an encouraging direction.

While traditional infrastructure, such as banks, is still male-dominated, other areas, especially in sales and marketing, are now becoming rapidly equalized between men and women, and a woman who is beginning her own business should look to the marketing and/or sales sector for an experienced and savvy mentor to help her steer her ship through the riptides and shoals of the startup ocean.

Continue onto Entrepreneur to read the complete article.

The iGen iEverything Train is Coming, but Are You Ready?

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iGen

Technology is being consumed at an ever increasing rate causing executives, managers, and process improvement experts on the factory floor to re-define the methods of training and dissemination that have become obsolete.

Critical skills and tribal knowledge are being lost as boomers retire and training plans for new employees fall short of preparing workers for the sophistication of the new manufacturing environment.

Move over millennials, here comes the IGen! Born between 1995 and 2005 this group of tech savvy natives is the next cohort and are just now entering the workforce. IGen, or Gen Z as they are often referred, have grown up in a world of social media where Youtube, Instagram, and Twitter reign supreme. These kids are a force to be reckoned with and require access to information in ways that are familiar, immediate, and actionable. Our success depends on them because as the IGen goes, so goes the manufacturing industry, the nation, and the world.

Alliance Resource Group, in partnership with Sify Technologies has pulled together experts from manufacturing, academia and automated methodologies to develop a solution that addresses the manufacturing challenge of this next generation and identifies the key components of a successful framework including content management, dissemination methodology, scalability, and integration with current learning management systems. These components constitute a micro-learning strategy that facilitates current and future state requirements.

Alliance Resource Group (ARG), is a service disabled veteran owned business located in Newport Beach California. With a foundation in resource management, recruiting, and consulting, ARG provides services to small and medium size companies throughout the United States.

View the ARG White Paper here! Better be prepared for total process transformation if you want to remain competitive.

Female CEO Takes on Tech Industry with Edge Music Network

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Elizabeth Vargas

Professional Woman’s Magazine (PWM) recently had the pleasure to speak with Elizabeth Vargas, founder and CEO of Edge Music Network.

PWM: Let’s start with the obvious question first: What’s your take on the lack of female leaders in the tech space?

EV:   I could give a dozen reasons and even more excuses for our gender’s absence in the C-suite—not only in tech but in nearly every industry—but I won’t. The truth is that no one cares about why you haven’t succeeded; they’re only interested in how you’ve succeeded. That’s where I want to go. I want to focus on the future, and prove that with vision, hustle and commitment that you can break through and achieve your dreams. That’s how I think I can help young and mature female entrepreneurs achieve their goals and dreams.

PWM:   Okay. Let’s go there… tell us your story.

EV:   As a child, I always loved music and theory but wasn’t allowed to watch TV until I was 13. My dad was a preacher and I think he thought that delaying my exposure would protect me from the outside world. So, it’s kind of funny that, of all programs, I got hooked on MTV. I remember thinking I would own it one day! That was my big dream– which eventually evolved into what is now Edge Music Network.

PWM:   A lot must have happened between “one day” and now…

EV:   In between, I gravitated to all things music, first studying jazz vocals at the Cornish College of the Arts and then creating the Vargas Girls Jazz Cabaret in Seattle–where we played in nightclubs. My experience in the music industry paved the way for Edge Music Network to acquire the content libraries of some of the largest music publishers in the world.

PWM:   Has there been anyone who has helped you along the way to achieve your big dream?

EV:   I get asked that question often. People assume since I’m a successful female CEO and entrepreneur, I have a powerful man or group backing me. It was the exact opposite. I had everyone around me including those closest to me telling me to quit while I was ahead and it couldn’t be done and to give up on a regular basis. But I can tell you, everything I’ve achieved has been of my own sheer will, passion and desire to work hard– beginning with the Vargas Girls. I had a day job testing software, which came naturally to me. Being tech-savvy helped me launch our first website and later, my own digital channels like YouTube live video, where I live-streamed and interviewed bands and rock legends—all while keeping focus on becoming the next MTV. The only thing that changed for me was the platform. Television wasn’t the only game in town.

PWM:   Speaking of the only game in town, explain Edge Music Network and how it diverges from other music video platforms like Spotify and Vevo.

EV:   Edge Music Network (EMN) globally streams premium music video content from top-tier distribution partners and independent artists. But it’s more than a free platform for fans to watch their favorite music videos and entertainment programming. EMN offers fans access—from phones, tablets, computers and TVs—to the music and artists they love while providing artists and record labels with the royalties they deserve. We’ve completely flipped the compensation structure of platforms like Spotify and Vevo that give artists 10 percent or less of the profit share. We ensure a 90/10 split in the artists’ favor. On top of that, because EMN believes in the transformative power of music, we dedicate 10 percent of ad revenue to charitable causes such as those that feed the hungry, house the homeless and help victims of natural disasters.

PWM:  Sounds like you found a straight path to your dream. Was it really so simple?

EV:   It has been anything but simple. I spent years learning how to navigate application development, digital rights agreements, content licensing and distribution and how to acquire the content libraries of some of the largest music publishers in the world to bring EMN to life. But it’s the decades of relationship-building with my partners, advisors, record labels and artists that serve as the foundation of EMN.

PWM:   What’s your advice for women today who want to pursue a career or start-up in tech?

EV:   Today, every business is tied to technology, whether you work behind a desk, with your hands, your voice or your heart. So, to say there are few women in tech will eventually become a thing of the past. What may remain unchanged is the lack of female LEADERS in tech and that’s a personal choice. It’s up to each one of us to find our passion, find a mentor, find a way to achieve our goals, whatever the odds or the required education. Learn it. Do it. Fail. Get back up and do it again. And again. And that’s never easy. But it’s certainly fulfilling.

About Elizabeth Vargas:
Elizabeth Vargas is the founder and CEO of Edge Music Network, a music video streaming service providing live and on-demand content through a video syndication platform. After studying jazz vocal and music theory at Cornish College of the Arts and attending Bellevue University to study international business and media technology, Vargas combined her passions and pursued a career in the music industry. Over several years, Vargas was able to learn the ins and outs of application development, which allowed her to effectively lead the development and engineering of EMN’s platform. She has decades of experience architecting and brokering digital rights agreements between content creators and publishers to ensure equitable revenue share and royalty distribution and has worked with industry leaders to fight for fair compensation structures to keep the music alive—all of which paved the way for Edge Music Network. With deep working knowledge in content licensing and distribution, application development, as well as strong industry partnerships, Vargas acquired the content libraries of some of the largest music publishers in the world to bring to life the Edge Music Network app that gives artists the royalties and respect they deserve while giving fans access to the music they love—anytime, anywhere, from any device.

With philanthropy at the core of Edge Music Network, Vargas has built one of the most technologically advanced platforms to bring people together with the power of music while providing support to charitable organizations that feed the hungry, aid victims of natural disasters and support homeless veterans. For more information, visit edgemusic.com. Download the app at Apple ITunes Store and Google Play.

Meet The Millennial Women Bringing Black Girl Magic To Advertising

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The ladies of 19th and Park, a creative marketing company are currently shaking up the male-dominated advertising industry, through their fresh take on video, social and experimental content. Meet Whitney Headen, Tahira White, and Nicole Januarie, affectionately coined as the trifecta of #blackgirlmagic. These three millennial women are passionate about helping companies cut through the noise of the media industry to create lasting and compelling content targeted to their key consumers. 19th & Park is committed to consistently integrating new technologies, influencers, micro-influencers, celebrities, and creative strategy to reach the population at mass to not only sell products but sell the lifestyle that comes with it.

Headen, White, and Januarie, started 19th &Park with the intention of creating a more diverse representation on the creative and innovation side for brands and agencies, given that there is a lack of inclusion within the advertising, social media and communications industries for African-American women.

Not only does the agency offer a full-service production and execution team ran and operated by women but they also provide an extended team of experts that lend out creative consultation, brand development, budget management and project for all creative products. The trifecta adds diversity and efficiency to rooms where those positions have never really existed while reinventing the traditional contractor role by presenting a full agency as an in-house creative team.

Since 2017, 19th & Park has worked on creative campaigns with Issa Rae, Nike, Prudential, Smirnoff, Coca-Cola, and Intel, to name a few. I spoke with the ladies of 19th and Park to learn about how they provide a 360-degree multimedia branding experience, what sparks their creativity and advice for the millennial determined to make it in the marketing and advertising industries.

Dominique Fluker: Share your career journeys. From working in marketing and production at Essence Magazine to freelancing for companies like Nike and Samsung, what led you all to collectively establish 19th &Park?

19th &Park: Whitney Headen: I grew up in a small town in Virginia and graduated college at the height of the recession. I chose to move to New York City to pursue opportunities in media that I knew I wouldn’t have a chance at getting in Virginia. For an entire year, I worked odd jobs in retail and volunteered with no luck at landing any opportunities in my field. Right when I was ready to leave and head back to Virginia, I received an email that I got an internship at MTV about a year and a half after graduation. Although you had to be a student to be an intern, I knew this was my one shot to get into my field so I told them I was still in school and started interning. After working on set for about a year, I realized that that wasn’t my passion or the journey I wanted to take so at a networking event I met the head of digital at BET and was offered a job as his assistant immediately. This job introduced to the world of integrated marketing basically where you used production and marketing strategies to seamlessly integrate brands into digestible content.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.